Smithsonian Voices

From the Smithsonian Museums

Calling All Volunteers, the Smithsonian Latino Center Wants You

In spring 2022, the first national Latino gallery at the Smithsonian will open its doors to the public at the National Museum of American History; the public is asked to help

Angelica Medina, 2009 Young Ambassadors Program alumna.

Just a Thought | Representation in Children's Books

Adán Chávez YAP ’14

The Importance of Latino Involvement in 2020 Census

The Smithsonian Latino Center offers fun learning opportunities that celebrate Latinidad.

Six Fun Learning Activities for April

Comic book illustration from La Borinqueña #1,written and created by Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez. Illustration by Will Rosado and digital colors by Juan Fernández.© 2016 SomosArte, LLC.

We Are Still Here: The First Taíno Movement Exhibition

1992 stamp commemorating the life and work of Bartolomé de las Casas, a Dominican friar who denounced Spanish abuses against the Caribbean's Native people. Though he regretted it later, he recommended increasing the number of enslaved Africans to lessen the burden on Native communities. Courtesy of the National Postal Museum. Estampilla de 1992 en conmemoración de la vida y trabajo de Bartolomé de las Casas, un fraile dominicano que denunció los abusos de los españoles contra los pueblos indígenas del Caribe. Aunque luego se arrepintió, recomenó aumentar el número de africanos esclavizados para mitigar la carga de las comunidades indígenas. Cortesía del Museo Nacional del Correo.

Rereading Bartolomé de las Casas

Smithsonian Latino Center avatar representation of La Llorona

Ante el río / Before the River

Smithsonian Latino Center, Hollywood Forever Collections

Literary Calaveras

Smithsonian Latino Center avatar representation of La Llorona

¡Ay, mis hijos!, a Llorona Story

Young Ambassador, Yesenia Muñoz at the children’s baile folklórico performance. (Courtesy of the National Museum of Mexican Art.)

Teamwork Makes the Dream Work