Weather

The steering wheel at the site of the newly identified shipwreck

Eight Decades Ago, a Ship Vanished Into the Depths of Lake Superior. Why Did the Captain Remain Aboard?

The wreck of the S.S. Arlington has finally been found—but it provides no answers about Captain Frederick Burke's final moments

A house in the Beverly Crest neighborhood of Los Angeles was pushed off its foundation by a mudslide on Monday morning. No one was in the house when the mudslide occurred. Recent storms caused at least 475 mudslides in the Los Angeles area.

California Hammered by Heavy Rains, Mudslides in Devastating Atmospheric River Storms

Some areas received as much as 13 to 15 inches of rain over a five-day period as storms felled trees, destroyed homes and killed nine people

Dry and cracked ground at the La Vinuela reservoir near Málaga, Spain, last year. Reservoirs in the country's Catalonia region have fallen to 16 percent capacity amid years of drought and extreme heat.

Earth Clocks Hottest January on Record, Marking 12 Months Above 1.5 Degree Celsius Warming Threshold

Though the world has not officially breached the Paris Agreement, the historic heat on land and at sea is a "significant milestone"

Researchers studied climate fluctuations in Roman Italy between 200 B.C.E. and 600 C.E.

Plagues That Ravaged the Roman Empire Were Linked to Periods of Cold Weather

The changing climate may have had ripple effects that made people more susceptible to disease, new research suggests

This small, bucolic waterfall in Western New York has one highly photogenic feature: a grotto lit by a dancing orange flame.

Seven Natural Phenomena Worth Traveling For

You need to be in the right place at the right time to see these celestial and earthly wonders

Researchers studied roughly 50 numbats over the course of a year.

As the Planet Warms, Australia's Numbats Are at Risk of Overheating

The endangered, squirrel-sized marsupials forage for termites during the day—but they can become too hot after just ten minutes in direct sunlight, according to new research

Researchers measure California snowpack levels at Phillips Station in the Sierra Nevada on January 2.

Climate Change Is Melting Snowpack, Pushing Some Regions Past a 'Snow-Loss Cliff'

Some of the Northern Hemisphere's most populous areas are at risk of warming past a critical threshold, after which snowpack melts rapidly with even small rises in temperature, study finds

In the extreme heat of summer 2023, saguaro cactuses died in Arizona.

2023 Broke Temperature Records. Will 2024 Be Even More Extreme?

Climate scientists have confirmed that last year's heat was unprecedented, surpassing records by a wide margin—but it could be one of the coolest years to come

The S.S. Point Reyes has become a popular tourist destination and photoshoot spot.

This Instagram-Famous Abandoned Boat May Soon Disappear From California Shoreline

The already-dilapidated S.S. Point Reyes suffered more damage during the recent storms that pummeled the coast

The silk dress, which dates to the mid-1880s, in which the pieces of paper containing the code were found. They were tucked in a hidden pocket, the opening of which was hidden by an overskirt.

'Unsolvable' Code Hidden in Antique Dress Pocket Is Finally Cracked

Short, handwritten lines of unrelated words contained coded weather reports to send via telegraph in the late 19th century

Lake Michigan, pictured here in December 2022, had 0.1 percent ice cover on Jan. 1, 2024.

The Great Lakes Reached a Record Low for Ice Cover on New Year's Day

The 'extreme' lack of ice follows warm temperatures in December and calls attention to recent downward trends in ice coverage on the lakes

More than 200 cold-stunned turtles have already been rescued since November.

52 Cold-Stunned Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtles Rescued From Cape Cod

The critically endangered creatures were flown by private plane to rehabilitation centers in Florida

Our ten favorite science books of the year covered everything from astronomy to undersea exploration.

The Ten Best Science Books of 2023

From stories on the depths of the ocean to the stars in the sky, these are the works that moved us the most this year

This year's titles include Daughter of the Dragon, Whalefall and Witness.

Smithsonian Scholars Recommend Their Favorite Books of 2023

Curators and staffers satisfied their endless curiosity with novels, short stories, biographies, art collections and journalistic reporting

In 1958, dozens of red-breasted flycatchers, like the one pictured here, flew off course and visited the United Kingdom.

One Reason Migrating Birds Get Lost Is Out of This World

Solar energy can alter the Earth’s magnetic field and likely lead the animals astray

Meteorological records from USS Pennsylvania, seen here off the Virginia coast in 1927, helped fill a gap in 20th century marine weather records.

How Citizen Scientists Rescued Crucial World War II Weather Data

Newly declassified documents from the Pacific theater have been digitized and could improve climate models

The aftermath of a multi-vehicle pileup on I-55 on Oct. 23, 2023 that occured because "super fog" lowered visibility.

Dense 'Super Fog' Causes Deadly Car Crashes in Louisiana

The thick haze lowers visibility to less than ten feet and forms when smoke from smoldering leaves, brush or trees mixes with moisture in cool air

Cheetahs may give up their prey to a larger predator, such as a lion or leopard, if one comes along while they are eating.

Cheetahs Become More Nocturnal in Extreme Heat, Study Finds

Hunting later at night may force the big cats to surrender their prey to larger carnivores, such as lions and leopards

A tornado churns up dust at dusk near Traer, Iowa.

How and Why Do Violent Tornadoes Form?

Scientists hope new technology and computing power will help them understand destructive twisters

Hurricane Otis caused major damage in Acapulco, Mexico.

Hurricane Otis Slams Mexico in 'Nightmare Scenario' That Shocked Meteorologists

The storm rapidly intensified in just 24 hours before it hit Acapulco as a category 5, killing at least 27 people and destroying infrastructure

Page 1 of 24