National Museum of the American Indian

Maria Marable-Bunch, associate director for museum learning and programs of the National Museum of the American Indian, in the exhibition
Plains nations' pipes and pipe bags from the collections of the National Museum of the American Indian  and the Division of Anthropology, American Museum of Natural History. On view in the exhibition “Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations” at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. (Ernest Amoroso, Smithsonian)
Thanksgiving, as the United States’ origin story, leaves out painful truths about the nation’s history. Giving thanks, however, has always been part of Native Americans’ everyday lives. Image: Earnest L. Spybuck (Absentee Shawnee, 1883–1949).
Alaska Magazine calls the Inuit drum-dance group Pamyua
Johns Hopkins University observed Indigenous Peoples’ Day for the first time in 2018. “The culture around Columbus and how Natives are viewed is slowly changing,” Indigenous Students at Hopkins (ISH) president Tyra Andrews said that day. “It’s really important, especially for the younger generations.” Organized by ISH and the university's Office of Multicultural Affairs, the commemoration included a campus powwow  and an evening presentation by Victoria O’Keefe (Cherokee and Seminole of Oklahoma), assistant professor in the Center for American Indian Health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Photo courtesy of Tom Jefferson Jr.)

Indigenous Peoples’ Day: Rethinking How We Celebrate American History

October 11th, 2019, 4:00PM
Woodrow Wilson “Woody” Roach. Italy, 1944 or 1945. (Photo courtesy of Della Boyer)
Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne and Hodulgee Muscogee) at the opening of the exhibition
Command Sergeant Major Julia Kelly (U.S. Army retired), one of 80 Native American delegates to the 75th anniversary observance of D-Day, stands on Omaha Beach. Kelly holds an eagle feather staff, an American Indian symbol of respect, honor, and patriotism. (Courtesy of Julia Kelly)