Articles by Jimmy Stamp

Much of the timber used for T3 came from trees killed by the mountain pine beetle.

Is Timber the Future of Urban Construction?

A celebrated architect goes out on a limb with a bold new take on building tall

Andrew Carnegie built his mansion on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 91st Street, asking for the “most modest, plainest, and most roomy house in New York.”

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Makes Its Grand Re-Opening in New York City

The old and the new crash into each other beautifully in the former Carnegie mansion

The Hunger Games cornucopia from the first movie.

The Architecture of the Hunger Games' Horns of Plenty

What inspired the architectural object at the center of the Hunger Games arena?

The Innovative Spirit - OLD

Designing for Seniors and Soldiers, Toward a "Silver" Architecture

Going green is good, but could architects be doing more for two segments of our population?

A pixelated design by the architecture firm Snøhetta will soon grace Norway's money.

Architects and Designers Make Money for Norway

Literally, that is. Two firms have been selected to design Norway’s new currency.

The Annie Pfeiffer Chapel on the campus of Florida Southern College

Rebuilding a Frank Lloyd Wright Classic With 3-D Printed Blocks

A 70-year-old chapel on the campus of a Florida university is being restored thanks to new, innovative technology

Universal Studios in Hollywood has a stunt show and set inspired by the 1995 film Waterworld.

Anthropocene

10 Architectural Schemes That Could Help Us Adapt To Rising Seas

From a floating house to a mobile city shaped like a giant lilypad, designers offer up some wild solutions for a wetter future

People's Design Award collage

The People’s Design Award Promises a Very Cyborg Future

This year's nominees focus on wearable technology

The corner in downtown Hartford where the first pay phone was installed

The Pay Phone's Journey From Patent to Urban Relic

The history of the device that is well on its way to becoming, well, history

The hand-axe, reimagined.

Designers Remake Our Oldest Tool Using Our Newest Tool

More than a million years old, the hand axe is over due for an update

A new font for Cooper Hewitt

To Redesign a Design Museum Start with the Typeface

The Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum is renovating and rebranding with a tailor-made typeface

These Smart Bricks Mean the Time Has Finally Arrived: Adults Have Legos of Their Own

A construction company aims to build more efficiently with modular connecting bricks

Marcel Breuer's proposed Roosevelt Memorial

Washington, D.C.

The Failed Attempt to Design a Memorial for Franklin Roosevelt

The debacle of the Eisenhower memorial is only the most recent entry in a grand D.C. tradition of fraught monuments

Anyone with a touchscreen can help shape the constantly evolving Universal Typeface.

The Universal Typeface Project Averages the World's Handwriting to Produce an Incredibly Average Font

With your help, ballpoint pioneer BIC aims to create a font as common as their pens

The yellow card is an elegant design solution that has been adopted by several sports.

World Cup 2014

Who Invented the Yellow Card?

Penalty cards are a surprisingly recent creation that were, perhaps unsurprisingly, inspired by traffic lights

New fabrication techniques and digital technologies are expanding the possibilities of the analog medium.

Forget Vinyl. Forget the Cloud. In the Future We'll Listen to Music on UV-Cured 3D-Printed Resin

Musicians, developers, and inventors prove that there's more to records than vinyl

Various examples of garderobe design

From Turrets to Toilets: A Partial History of the Throne Room

For centuries the humble bathroom has been shaping the space we live and work

A hourd in Carcassonne

The Medieval Origin Story of the Balcony

Architect/historian Eugène Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc suggested that the balcony was forged in the heat of battle.

Eliot R. Brown's hand drawn map of Gotham.

The Cartographer Who Mapped Out Gotham City

Batman has been guarding Gotham for 75 years, but its city limits weren't defined until 1998

Lodgers in a crowded Bayard Street tenement, 1889.

Pioneering Social Reformer Jacob Riis Revealed "How The Other Half Lives" in America

How innovations in photography helped this 19th century journalist improve life for many of his fellow immigrants

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