Disease

Gene editing has produced a healthy "founder population" of pigs that are immune to a deadly virus called porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, according to a new study.

Gene-Edited Pork Could Be Coming Soon to Your Dinner Plate

Scientists are using CRISPR technology to make pigs immune to a deadly virus—and they're hoping for FDA approval by early next year

The 23 pairs of human chromosomes. People who inherit two tall X chromosomes (bottom right) are much more susceptible to autoimmune diseases than people with one X and one short Y chromosome.

Why Do Women Get More Autoimmune Diseases? Study of Mice Hints at Answers

Four in five people with an autoimmune disease are women. New research points to an RNA molecule involved in silencing one of their X chromosomes as a potential culprit

Greenhouse gas emissions that result from burning fossil fuels drive climate change.

Six Big Ways Climate Change Could Impact the United States by 2100

Climate change is expected to affect all parts of the country in the coming decades, threatening everything from our food supply to our coastlines

A Parkinson’s patient in Nice, France, is prepped for a surgery to implant electrodes into the brain. The technique, called deep brain stimulation, is being used experimentally or in small studies to treat addiction.

Can a Brain Implant Treat Addiction?

Some experts tout deep brain stimulation as a lifeline for people struggling with opioid use. Others question the hype

A 2,000-year-old human skeleton found at the Jabuticabeira II burial site in Brazil.

DNA From 2,000-Year-Old Skeletons Hints at the Origins of Syphilis

In contrast to a common theory, new findings suggest Columbus-led expeditions may not have transported syphilis to Europe from the Americas, though they cannot disprove the claim with certainty

Genes that significantly increase risk of developing multiple sclerosis were introduced to northwestern Europe by herders who migrated from the east around 5,000 years ago.

Ancient DNA From Eurasian Herders Sheds Light on the Origins of Multiple Sclerosis

Genetic variants linked to the risk of MS were brought to Europe during a migration around 5,000 years ago, a new study finds—and they might have helped herders survive

A Tuskegee study subject gets his blood drawn in the mid-20th century.

What Newly Digitized Records Reveal About the Tuskegee Syphilis Study

The archival trove chronicles the extreme measures administrators took to ensure Black sharecroppers did not receive treatment for the venereal disease

An illustration of life in medieval Cambridge

'Bone Biographies' Reconstruct Lives of Medieval Cambridge Commoners

Researchers have used skeletal remains to compile information about the lives of ordinary residents of the city

A mule deer carcass in Yellowstone National Park tested positive for the fatal neurological illness known as chronic wasting disease.

'Zombie Deer Disease' Documented in Yellowstone for the First Time

The neurological condition, called chronic wasting disease, has a 100 percent fatality rate in the deer, moose and elk it infects

Researchers at the Ohio State University collected 9,287 Asian longhorned ticks in just 90 minutes using lint rollers.

An Invasive Tick That Can Clone Itself Is Spreading Across the U.S., Threatening Livestock

Researchers documented three cows in Ohio killed by Asian longhorned ticks, which can lay up to 2,000 eggs without needing to mate

Neurergus kaiseri, also called Luristan newt, is listed as vulnerable on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species. 

Amphibians Are in Decline Across the Globe

About 41 percent of all species across the planet meet IUCN criteria for classification as critically endangered, endangered or vulnerable

Many organizations classify hypertension as a blood pressure reading of 140/90 mmHg or higher, though some say 130/80 mmHg.

High Blood Pressure Is a 'Silent Killer' That Affects One in Three People, WHO Says

But nearly half of those living with the condition don't know they have it, according to the organization's first report on hypertension

Two types of white blood cells, a neutrophil (top) and a lymphocyte (bottom), in human blood.

Human Cells Display a Mathematical Pattern That Repeats in Nature and Language

New research suggests adult humans have between 28 trillion and 36 trillion cells, which follow a commonly seen distribution of size and mass

FDA panelists say phenylephrine itself isn't dangerous, but taking it could lead to sick patients delaying effective treatment.

Leading Decongestant in Cold and Flu Medicines Doesn't Work, FDA Advisory Panel Says

Phenylephrine, a popular ingredient in over-the-counter remedies, is no better than a placebo, per the panel

Candida auris

This Fungus Is Quickly Spreading, and Climate Change May Be to Blame

Washington state reported its first case of Candida auris, which can cause illness in people with weakened immune systems

Researchers estimate the states with the highest rates of Alzheimer's disease are Maryland, New York and Mississippi.

Here's Where the Highest Rates of Alzheimer's Are in the United States

A first-of-its-kind report estimates Alzheimer's disease prevalence in 3,142 counties across the nation

The research team stands alongside the SARS-CoV-2 wet cyclone aerosol sampler they developed.

New Device Can Detect Covid in the Air Within Five Minutes

Researchers report the technology is 77 to 83 percent accurate in finding any of the coronavirus variants in a room

Roughly six million Americans have Alzheimer's disease.

FDA Fully Approves First Drug Meant to Slow Alzheimer's Disease

The drug showed promise in an 18-month clinical trial, but some experts have expressed concerns about its safety and cost

Craig's closet was unveiled at St. Vincent's Triangle earlier this month.

New Sculpture Comes to New York City's AIDS Memorial Park

"Craig's closet" stands near the former site of St. Vincent's, a hospital at the center of the city's AIDS epidemic

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How an 1800s Midwife Solved a Poisonous Mystery

For decades before Doctor Anna’s discovery, “milk sickness” terrorized the Midwest, killing thousands of Americans on the frontier

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