Smithsonian Voices

The Smithsonian Institution has hundreds of scholars, researchers and curators, each with an amazing story to tell about their work, their quests and their passions. Here is a sampling of the unique voices that make up the chorus of ideas at the Institution.

A team of Smithsonian scientists excavating the Hart Chalet site found a double tournois copper coin minted for French King louis XIII in 1634.  In pristine condition, it would have looked similar to this 1638 double tournois coin. (Images courtesy of the National Numismatic Collection, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. Image composite by Anna Torres)
How much do you know about water?
Members of a delegation from the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians read names of the signers of the Treaty of Fort Wayne of 1809 as the museum prepares to place the treaty on exhibit. From left: Tribal Council Member Wayne (Alex) Wesaw, Council Chairman John P. Warren, Council Elders Representative Judy Winchester, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer; Jason S. Wesaw, and Council Vice Chairman Robert (Bob) Moody, Jr. National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C., September 2017. (Kevin Wolf/AP Images for National Museum of the American Indian)
A nocturnal Swallow-tailed Gull sneaks in an afternoon nap, purposefully placing its beak atop its back and under its feathers to rest its neck and stay warm. (Matthew Williams)
Ningiukulu Teevee, (Canadian [Cape Dorset], b. 1963),
Onboard science leads Drs. Chris Mah and Chris Kelley and NOAA Educational Partnership Program Intern Nikola Rodriguez discuss and take a closer look at deepwater habitats explored with remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer on Horizon Guyot. (Image courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2017 Laulima O Ka Moana)
Starfish and other echinoderms are extremely important to the biodiversity of our oceans. (Image: Comstock Images/Stockbyte/Thinkstock)

All About Starfish

September 6th, 2017, 10:09AM
Niuam (Comanche) fan with sun and Morning Star designs (detail), ca. 1880. Oklahoma. 2/1617. (Credit: National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian)
The swearing in of Wilma Mankiller as Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Charlie Soap holds the Bible; the others are unidentified. Courtesy of the Wilma Mankiller Foundation.
The Q'eswachaka Bridge has been rebuilt continuously since the time of the Inkas. (Doug McMains, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian)