New England

Samples gathered at Wells Beach, shown here, revealed that the mysterious brown substance was made up of millions of bug carcasses.

Millions of Microscopic Fly Carcasses Left Dark Stains on People's Feet at New England Beaches

The unusual event affected a 70-mile stretch of beaches from Massachusetts to Maine

A portrayal of  Henry Every, a pirate who may have possessed the newly discovered coin.

17th-Century Coins Found in a Fruit Grove May Solve a 300-Year-Old Pirate Mystery

Amateur historian Jim Bailey was mystified by the Arabic writing on the discovered loot

Borden was acquitted of her father and stepmother's murders, but she remained under suspicion for the rest of her life.

The House Where Lizzie Borden's Family Was Murdered Is Up for Sale

You can now take a virtual tour of the Massachusetts property, which most recently served as a bed and breakfast

The basking shark's scientific name, Cetorhinus maximus, approximately translates to "big-nosed marine monster."

Twenty-Six-Foot-Long Basking Shark Washes Up on Maine Beach

Though often mistaken for great whites, these sea creatures are filter feeders and gentle giants of the sea

This painting depicts the night the Phoenix steamboat caught fire on Lake Champlain.

Cool Finds

Lost Pieces of 19th-Century Steamboat Wreck Found in Vermont

Divers discovered the Phoenix's hull in 1978, but the vessel's wheels remained lost—until now

Sipson Island in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, opened to the public on July 25.

Cape Cod Island Opens to the Public for the First Time in 300 Years

When Sipson Island went on the luxury real estate market in 2018, locals saw an opportunity for conservation

Plimoth Plantation is a living history museum that features a recreation of Plymouth's 17th-century English village and a Wampanoag homesite.

Massachusetts' Plimoth Plantation Will Change Its Name

The new moniker will incorporate the Mashpee Wampanoag name for the region: Patuxet

“Their bone size indicates that they were probably militiamen,” says archaeologist Nicholas Bellantoni. "Their femur bones show that they clearly walked a lot and carried a lot of weight back in their day.”

Cool Finds

Skeletons Unearthed in Connecticut May Belong to Revolutionary War Soldiers

If confirmed, the bones would be the first remains recovered from Revolutionary War soldiers in the Constitution State

Flying Santa plane flies past Boston Light in 1947.

After 90 Years, the 'Flying Santa' Is Still Dropping Gifts From a Plane

In New England, a long-standing tradition continues with pilots delivering gifts to lighthouses and lifesaving stations

The three-story Victorian property still looks much like it did in Rockwell's day.

A Victorian Property Featured in an Iconic Norman Rockwell Painting Is Now on Sale

The building is depicted in "Home for Christmas," which captures the holiday season in Rockwell’s hometown

Americans who distrusted their Catholic, French-speaking neighbors burned the Old South Church in Bath, Maine.

When an Influx of French-Canadian Immigrants Struck Fear Into Americans

In the late 19th century, they came to work in New England cotton mills, but the <i>New York Times</i>, among others, saw something more sinister

Nantucket harbor

Follow Herman Melville's Footsteps Through Nantucket

The writer visited the island off of Cape Cod only after he penned <em>Moby Dick</em>

The family of Jaidyn MacCorison, 11 (at a New Hampshire gas station), goes back generations in the region.

The Mysterious Beauty of Robert Frost's New England

These stark yet stunning landscapes inspired the lyricism of the American titan of poetry

Cool Finds

Newly Discovered Artifacts Reignite Feud Over Which Town Is Connecticut's Oldest

Wethersfield and Windsor both date back to the early 17th century, but which came first is a matter of debate

Trending Today

Why Fall Color Has Been So Meh in Parts of the U.S. This Year

A hot fall and excess rain robbed much of the East Coast of its annual leaf show

Wealthy Bostonian John Freake who, a new caption reveals, owned a slave.

Cool Finds

Museum Ties Portraits of the Wealthy to Their Slaveholding Pasts

New signs at the Worcester Art Museum illuminate how wealthy New Englanders benefitted from the slave trade