Getty Just Made 4,600 Incredible Images Public Domain

These images must still be credited, but they can be used for both commercial and non-commercial material

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Hippolyte Bayard, photographer, French, about 1842

The J. Paul Getty Trust has an incredible collection of artwork including art from Monet, van Gogh, Rembrandt, da Vinci and more. Now, nearly 5,000 pieces of art from that collection have been opened up to the public for free use. You can browse the collection here, and it includes some incredible photographs of science and engineering like:

Getty Just Made 4,600 Incredible Images Public Domain
Roger Fenton, photographer, English, 1854 – 1858 84.XP.452.3
Getty Just Made 4,600 Incredible Images Public Domain
Louis-Émile Durandelle, photographer, Exposition universelle de 1889 / État d’avancement. French, November 23, 1888 87.XM.121.16
Getty Just Made 4,600 Incredible Images Public Domain
Nadar, photographer, French, about 1863 84.XC.873.5906
Getty Just Made 4,600 Incredible Images Public Domain
Unknown, photographer, Moon Crater. British, late 1850s 84.XP.259.16

Along with some of these famous paintings:

Getty Just Made 4,600 Incredible Images Public Domain
Claude Monet, Wheatstacks, Snow Effect, Morning (Meules, Effet de Neige, Le Matin). French, 1891 95.PA.63
Getty Just Made 4,600 Incredible Images Public Domain
Paul Cézanne , Still Life with Apples. French, 1893 – 1894 96.PA.8
Getty Just Made 4,600 Incredible Images Public Domain
Vincent van Gogh , Irises. Dutch, 1889 90.PA.20

Why would the Getty put their art online for free, you ask? They anticipated that question and addressed it in their announcement:

Why open content? Why now? The Getty was founded on the conviction that understanding art makes the world a better place, and sharing our digital resources is the natural extension of that belief. This move is also an educational imperative. Artists, students, teachers, writers, and countless others rely on artwork images to learn, tell stories, exchange ideas, and feed their own creativity. In its discussion of open content, the most recent Horizon Report, Museum Edition stated that “it is now the mark—and social responsibility—of world-class institutions to develop and share free cultural and educational resources.” I agree wholeheartedly.

These images must still be credited, but they can be used for both commercial and non-commercial material. They can be edited, built upon, and used however people please. And the Getty hopes you take them up on it.

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