Smithsonian Journeys Danube Issue

The Habsburgs were once the most powerful family in Austria, but when they tried to strengthen their bloodline by intermarrying, a lack of genetic diversity led to their downfall.

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Snapshots From the Danube

The gardens of Vienna's Schönbrunn Palace (Douglas Moore, Smithsonian.com Photo Contest Archives)
Waiting for the train in Budapest (Maryanne Yeary, Smithsonian.com Photo Contest Archives)
Budapest lit up at night (Balaz Kiss, Smithsonian.com Photo Contest Archives)
Waterfalls in Germany's Black Forest near Triberg (Richard Berry, Smithsonian.com Photo Contest Archives)
A bronze man gazes out at passerbys in Bratislava from a pothole. (Charles Carlson, Smithsonian.com Photo Contest Archives)
A man fishes at sunset on Murighiol Lake in Romania's Danube Delta. (Dimitra Stasinopoulou, Smithsonian.com Photo Contest Archives)
The grounds of Vienna's Hofburg Palace as seen from the President's Office (Christina Roemer, Smithsonian.com Photo Contest Archives)
An old tram crosses the Danube in Budapest. (Bruno Afonso, Smithsonian.com Photo Contest Archives)
In Vienna, a modern building reflects an historic one. (Christina Roemer, Smithsonian.com Photo Contest Archives)
Cobblestone streets in Bratislava (Paula Cabrera de Silva, Smithsonian.com Photo Contest Archives)
Budapest's Chain Bridge at dusk (Edward Applebaum, Smithsonian.com Photo Contest Archives)

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