European History

Karl Friedrich Hieronymus, the real Baron Münchhausen, was a retired German officer who fought with a Russian regiment in two campaigns against the Ottoman Empire.

The 18th-Century Baron Who Lent His Name to Munchausen Syndrome

The medical condition is named after a fictional storyteller who in turn was based on a real-life German nobleman known for telling tall tales

Researchers found the train car during excavations in northern Antwerp.

Rare 100-Year-Old Train Carriage Found Buried in Belgium

The wooden LNER train wagon was a "removals truck" used to move people's belongings between residences

Lofoten Islands, Norway

Northern Europe and the British Isles

Explore the region's history, culture and natural wonders

An artistic representation of the Gotlant burial of a Viking-era woman with a modified skull

Vikings May Have Used Body Modification as a 'Sign of Identification'

A recent study analyzes Scandinavian examples of filed teeth and elongated skulls dating to the Viking Age

Reconstruction illustrating sliding cover as it opens, featuring Lorenzo Lotto's Portrait of Giovanna de' Rossi (left) and Portrait Cover With an Allegory of Chastity (right), circa 1505

Why Were So Many Renaissance Portraits Multisided?

A new exhibition at the Met is the first to examine the tradition of covered 15th- and 16th-century portraits, which were designed to be interactive and often portable

Julianne Moore as Mary Villiers and Nicholas Galitzine as her son George Villiers in "Mary & George"

The Real Story Behind 'Mary & George'

The new mini-series dramatizes the Villiers family’s scandalous rise to power at the court of England's James I

Most of the combs found in Ipswich were made of deer antlers, but some were carved from animal bones.

Trove of Viking Combs Sheds Light on English Town's Medieval History

The hair care items are part of a sprawling collection of artifacts found in Ipswich between 1974 and 1994, which are now the subject of a new book

The marble statue likely depicts the Greek god Apollo and decorated a fountain in Philippi.

Archaeologists Find Ancient Statue of Apollo That Probably Adorned a Magnificent Fountain

The marble bust sheds new light on the layered history of a 2,000-year-old Greek city

Some said the pirate king went to ground in London or Scotland, others that he died penniless and was buried in an unmarked grave in Devon. Or was he sipping fine French wine in the hills above Marseille?

The Notorious Pirate King Who Vanished With the Riches of a Mughal Treasure Ship

In the late 17th century, Henry Avery—the subject of the first global manhunt—bribed his way into the Bahamas

This staircase, part of an active construction site, has been preserved since the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 C.E.

Archaeologists in Pompeii Find Ancient Construction Site, Undisturbed Since Vesuvius' Eruption

The discovery is cluing researchers into the techniques used to build Rome’s most remarkable structures

The castle's mill was integrated into the residential space and powered by a canal that flowed beneath the building.

Archaeologists Uncover Medieval Castle Hidden Beneath a French Hotel

Excavations revealed a moat, pipes, jewelry, coins and other artifacts amidst the structure's ruins

The skate was discovered in Přerov, a city in the Czech Republic's eastern Olomouc region through which the Bečva river flows.

Archaeologists Unearth 1,000-Year-Old Ice Skate Made of Animal Bone in Czech Republic

The artifact dates to a time when skates were used primarily for practical purposes

Richard Brock found the nugget using an old back-up metal detector.

Man With Broken Metal Detector Unearths Largest Gold Nugget Ever Found in England

Richard Brock stumbled upon the treasure, valued at more than $38,000, about 20 minutes after starting his search

In recent years, three papal bulls have been found near the Polish village of Wysoka Kamieńska.

The Broken Seal of a Pope's 14th-Century Decree Has Been Found in Poland

The metal fragment was once part of a papal bull, an official communication distributed by the Catholic Church

The propeller blade was discovered wrapped in a potato sack in Coire a’Bhradain on the isle of Arran in Scotland.

Mysterious World War II Plane Propeller Found in Scottish Peat Bog

The object likely broke off a doomed plane during a crash on the isle of Arran

Independent craniofacial anthropologist Chris Rynn created lifelike facial reconstructions of four individuals who lived in the region.

See the Faces of Four Scots Across Thousands of Years of History, Brought to Life Using A.I.

The Perth Museum in Scotland is unveiling digital reconstructions of men and women who lived in the region from the Bronze Age through the 16th century

A metal detectorist discovered this silver thimble while scanning the grounds of Carew Castle.

Metal Detectorist Discovers 300-Year-Old Silver Thimble Engraved With a Romantic Inscription

The artifact, which features the words "like enduringly, love forever," had been declared a treasure by officials in Wales

Made from alder wood, this canoe was thought to have been a fishing boat. 

Five Canoes Discovered Northwest of Rome Are the Oldest Boats Ever Found in the Mediterranean

The 7,000-year-old vessels offer evidence of advanced seafaring technology and an extensive regional trade network, a new study suggests

Discovered by a metal detectorist in the village of Wólka Nieliska, the badge is about an inch wide.

A Medieval Pilgrim May Have Carried This Basilisk Pendant to Guard Against Evil

Found in Poland, the "pilgrim's badge" was likely worn by a Christian traveler hundreds of years ago

Archaeologists uncovered a trove of artifacts, including this scorched axe, from a Bronze Age settlement called Must Farm.

Incredibly Well-Preserved Bronze Age Village Reveals a Snapshot of Early British Life Before a Fire

Residents fled when flames burned through the Must Farm settlement, and now, archaeologists have unearthed its buildings and objects that were preserved in a riverbed

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