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Letters

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Survival Of The Fittest
All life-forms live because of their ability to adapt to their environment. “Coldblooded Rescue” [May 2010] reports another case of well-meaning humans adapting the environment to suit the limited survivability of endangered sea turtles. As the turtles continue to breed, they will continue to get trapped in Cape Cod Bay. Rescuers are making the turtles’ survivability dependent on them. We need to respect Darwin.
Wayne Gonzalez
San Jose, California

Altered Memory
Karim Nader’s belief that the act of remembering can change our memories [“Making Memories,” May 2010] echoes E. L. Doctorow in The Waterworks: “Remembrances take on a luminosity from their repetition in your mind...what you remember as having happened and what truly did happen are no less and no more than...visions.”
Charles Thomas
Midland, Texas

Hidden Hazards
Abigail Green’s Last Page essay [“Green Eggs and Salmonella?” June 2010] is a wonderful tour of must-read children’s literature. I hope her concerns about the hazards in the stories are meant as whimsy. Children are being smothered by virtual entertainment and controlled environments. Their stories should spark the imagi­nation, fire the thirst for adventure and fan the flames of independence. Put that party hat on, drive up that giant tree (the car has a seat belt) and get going, you crazy dogs!
Keith Blodgett
Mesa, Arizona

Customized Organs
The article about tissue engineering [“Organs Made to Order,” July/August 2010] was an inspirational look at what scientists are capable of. Who would have thought that crazy, space-age ideas like growing back a limb might someday become reality?
Amber N. Middlemiss
Wyoming, Michigan

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