Nevada - Landmarks and Points of Interest | Travel | Smithsonian
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Nevada - Landmarks and Points of Interest

Nevada - Landmarks and Points of Interest

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Las Vegas
Far more than a mere city, Las Vegas is a total-immersion experience of all that glitters. Not surprisingly, it's the most visited city in the United States. The nightlife never ends in this city of lights. Here, you can enjoy five-star hotels, thrill rides, top-rated shows, high-energy nightclubs and, of course, gambling. For those with a quieter sense of fun, art galleries, restaurants, and golf await. In the winter, stretch your legs at the Lee Canyon ski resort at Mount Charleston, just a few miles outside of town.

Fort Churchill
Built in 1860, the adobe-style fort offered protection to early settlers and migrants on the trail to California. The Pony Express, Central Overland Mail route, and Overland Telegraph once passed through the area. Today, the 4,461-acre Fort Churchill State Historic Park includes an interpretive trail, camping sites and a visitors center. The Nevada Civil War Volunteers recreate a Civil War encampment at Fort Churchill twice a year.

Fort Ruby
Built in 1862 halfway between Salt Lake City, Utah, and Carson City, to protect westward emigrants and the Central Overland Mail route, Fort Ruby's location was considered so remote and dangerous that the Army classified it as the "Worst Post in the West." Among its remains are some of the earliest surviving examples of pioneer log construction.

Virginia City Historic District
Thousands of dreams were born with the 1859 discovery of the Comstock Lode, one of the world's largest ore deposits, under what is now Virginia City. Between 1859 and 1878, the mines there yielded more than $500 billion worth of gold and silver in today's dollars, drawing tens of thousands of fortune-seeking prospectors, many of whom gained enormous wealth. Mining technology leapfrogged during those two gilded decades, and Virginia City became the prototype for later industrial boomtowns. The current highway follows the historic road that connects the settlements of Virginia City, Gold Hill, Silver City and Dayton.

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