Tsunami Debris Is Just Now Arriving at Hawaii’s Coast | Smart News | Smithsonian
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Tsunami Debris Is Just Now Arriving at Hawaii’s Coast

A dock 30-by-50 feet long, with Japanese writing on it, was found floating off the coast of Hawaii, around the same time that a plastic blue bin (a seafood storage container in its past life) became the first confirmed piece of tsunami debris to reach Hawaii. Authorities have not confirmed whether or not the dock was [...]

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At sea off Waimanalo, a 4×4′ plastic bin is towed in the Makai Pier. Photo: Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory.

A dock 30-by-50 feet long, with Japanese writing on it, was found floating off the coast of Hawaii, around the same time that a plastic blue bin (a seafood storage container in its past life) became the first confirmed piece of tsunami debris to reach Hawaii.

Authorities have not confirmed whether or not the dock was part of the debris that has been floating away from Japan since the tsunami struck in March 2011. But it is very similar to a dock that washed up in Oregon in June.

The docks are just a few of the weird bits of flotsam and jetsam that have journeyed across the Pacific in the wake of the disaster:

More debris is likely to appear as ocean currents slowly bring the bits and pieces to shore, and Pacific Coast states are bracing for impact.

 

More from Smithsonian.com:

The Science Behind the Japanese Earthquake
Did Broken Buoys Fail to Warn Victims of the Mentawai Tsunami?

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