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Here’s What Happened to Jack Because Rose Didn’t Save Him

After Jack's cold body sank down to the bottom of the North Atlantic in Titanic, here's probably what it looked like

After the sea lice feast. Image: Dave Pearson

We’ve been over how, in TitanicRose could totally have saved Jack from his icy death. But she didn’t. What happened to Jack next? Well, after his frozen body sunk down to the bottom of the North Atlantic, here’s probably what it looked like:

If you really didn’t like Jack, here’s what you might want to imagine happened to him. (Spoiler: this pig gets torn apart by some sharks.)

So what’s happening in the video above? VENUS, the deep sea observatory, put a pig down in the ocean to figure out what would happen to it. Since sharks can’t eat it—they’re kept out by the cage—smaller carnivores have at the pig all day and night. New Scientist writes:

Sharks are unable to tuck in since it’s enclosed (as is the octopus lurking at the end of the video), giving sea lice exclusive access to the remains. They enter orifices in droves to feast on the animal from the inside out and congregate on the cage bars to prevent other arthropods, like shrimp, from getting a bite. “By the end of the fourth day, the sea lice had left and the pigs were reduced to bones,” says Anderson.

Shrimp arrive to pick at the skeleton, eventually removing all the cartilage. The team then recovered the bones which, strangely, were jet black for a period of 48 hours. “This is something that has never been seen before,” says Lynne Bell, a member of the team. “Colleagues are working to identify the micro-organisms collected close to the bone, which may help to identify the unique chemistry of the change.”

Sorry Jack, in the ocean (and on land), everything eventually becomes food.

More from Smithsonian.com:

It’s Definitive: Rose and Jack Could Both Have Survived in Titanic
Decaying Trailer

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About Rose Eveleth
Rose Eveleth

Rose Eveleth is a writer for Smart News and a producer/designer/ science writer/ animator based in Brooklyn. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Scientific American, Story Collider, TED-Ed and OnEarth.

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