10 Things Science Says About Being A Mom In 2014- page 2 | Innovation | Smithsonian
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10 Things Science Says About Being A Mom In 2014

Among them: she usually underestimates the height of her youngest child and her diet when she conceives could change her offspring's DNA.

smithsonian.com

(Continued from page 1)

9) Whither the Tiger Mom?:  There just may be something to the Tiger Mother theory that purports Asian-American children excel in school because of their demanding mothers. Research published earlier this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concluded that it’s not socioeconomic status nor greater intellect that’s the biggest reason for Asian-American students' academic success.  No, said lead researchers Amy Hsin and Yu Xie: the key factor is one powerful work ethic.  The pair analyzed two national surveys that collected data on a combined more than 5,000 white and Asian students from kindergarten to high school and found that the latter’s higher level of achievement came down to the simple fact that, according to their teachers, Asian-American students worked harder.  While Tiger Mothers no doubt play a role, the researchers suggested that a greater influence is a community that’s big on sharing social resources that enhance the education of its children.

10) Thinking small:  This probably won’t come as a surprise, but moms tend to think their youngest child is shorter than he or she actually is. In a study published in Current Biology, researchers found that mothers typically underestimated the height of their youngest child by about 3 inches, but accurately estimated the heights of their older children. The Australian researchers also reported that 70 percent of the more than 700 mothers in the study said they noticed that their youngest child seemed bigger when a new baby was born in the family.  The scientists think this reflects the need of moms to nurture and protect their most vulnerable offspring.

No question that you owe a lot to dear old mom, but this goes both ways. Science also says that being a mother has made her smarter since the day you were born.

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