Gettysburg Artifacts From the Smithsonian Collections- page 5 | History | Smithsonian
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This above lithographic print depicts men in action during the Battle of Gettysburg. (Armed Forces History / NMAH)
This U.S. Army canteen, sporting a bulls-eye design and a painted scene of camp life, was found strewn near a fallen Union soldier at Gettysburg.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Armed Forces History / NMAH)
Photographer Mathew Brady captured the woods in which Maj. Gen. John F. Reynolds of the Union was killed during the battle.

Mathew Brady at Gettysburg
Artist: Mathew Brady Studio
1863
Albumen silver print
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(National Portrait Gallery)
Photos such as this one, from Gardner's Photographic Sketchbook of the War brought the Civil War even closer to home when they reached the masses.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Photographic History Collection / NMAH)
The headquarters of Maj. Gen. George Meade, photographed by Gardner.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Photographic History Collection / NMAH)
The Cemetery Ridge was the scene of some of the worst fighting at Gettysburg. It was at the knoll pictured here that the final assault by the Confederates was made.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Photographic History Collection / NMAH)
The view of the city of Gettysburg from afar, taken by Gardner.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Photographic History Collection / NMAH)
This photo, known as "A Harvest of Death," comes from Alexander Gardner’s Photographic Sketchbook of the War. On July 5, 1863, two days after the battle ended, Gardner and his assistants were the first photographers to arrive on the scene. He identified the dead men as Rebels, but later analysis revealed they were Federals whose shoes had been taken.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Photographic History Collection, NMAH)
A resident of Gettysburg, John Burns, often referred to as "the hero of Gettysburg" in historical records, fought alongside Union troops during the battle despite his advanced age.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Photographic History Collection / NMAH)
Gardner came upon this fallen Rebel sharpshooter a few days after the battle ended. Snipers, who hid behind boulders or in trenches, were valuable to both sides.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Photographic History Collection / NMAH)
A Harvest of Death, photo from Alexander Gardner’s Photographic Sketchbook of the War

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Photographic History Collection, NMAH)
Little Round Top, pictured here, is the smaller of two hills south of Gettysburg. It was here on the second day of the battle that the Confederates gained some leverage over the Union. As fighting raged on, bodies began to pile up in the grassy area.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Photographic History Collection / NMAH)
Major General Daniel Sickles used this farm as his headquarters during the battle. He was wounded in the field to the west of the barn. The home belonged to the Trossel family, a couple and their nine children. During the fighting, the family was forced out. When they returned after the battle, most of their possessions had been looted and their home severely damaged.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Photographic History Collection, NMAH)
This recruitment poster for Col. Joshua T. Owen’ 69th Pennsylvania Infantry regiment, raised in predominantly Irish and Welsh neighborhoods in Philadelphia, was printed in 1861. The regiment, accompanying Col. Edward Baker’s famous Philadelphia brigade, helped repel Pickett’s Charge, the final surge of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Armed Forces History / NMAH)
This ambrotype photograph of a woman holding an infant was found on the body of a Union soldier killed during the Battle of Gettysburg.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Armed Forces History / NMAH)
Strong Vincent, a young lawyer, used this sword during battle. Vincent, who was married the same day he enlisted in the Union Army. He once wrote his wife, “If I fall, remember you have given your husband to the most righteous cause that ever widowed a woman.” Strong helped defend Little Round Top, reportedly jumping up on to a boulder and shouting to his fellow men, "Don't give an inch." He was then shot in his thigh, and died five days later.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

(Armed Forces History / NMAH)

Gettysburg Artifacts From the Smithsonian Collections

150 years after the battle, the Battle of Gettysburg still looms large over the American imagination

In June, 1863, the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, with over 75,000 soldiers under General Robert E. Lee, crossed into Pennsylvania aiming to strike a crippling blow to Union forces. Lee hoped that a successful attack would end English and French neutrality and turn Northern opinion in favor of a negotiated peace. The Union Army of the Potomac, recently placed under Major General George Meade, was in pursuit with more than 88,000 soldiers. These two great armies met at Gettysburg.

On July 1, the most famous battle of the Civil War was waged. Three days later, the fighting was over. More than 6,000 lay dead and 45,000 were wounded or missing. The Union had come out as the victor.

These artifacts are a part of Smithsonian Books' fall release Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection

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