How Posters Helped Shape America and Change the World- page 5 | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian
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(Pam Valois, Don't Call Me Sweetheart: A Poster Exhibition of Women's Images and Issues, 1978. Collection of the Oakland Museum of California, All Of Us Or None Archive. Gift of The Rossman Family)

How Posters Helped Shape America and Change the World

One enthusiast's collection, on exhibit at the Oakland Museum of California, offers a sweeping look at grass-roots movements since the 1960s

Human Be-in / Stanley Mouse, artist / 1967 / 2010.54.743

Human Be in
(Stanley Mouse, The Bindweed Press, A Gathering of the Tribes for a Human Be-In, 1967. Collection of the Oakland Museum of California, All Of Us Or None Archive. Gift of The Rossman Family)
Visually striking, often mind-bending posters promoted the signature events that turned California into a mecca for spiritual seekers. Psychedelic drugs, music, flowers and a spirit of interdependence became the touchstones of a shared awakening that touched almost every aspect of American culture. This arresting lithograph was created at the Bindweed Press by the prolific Stanley Mouse, an artist considered by many to be the godfather of psychedelic posters. The roster for this San Francisco “Be-in” included Allen Ginsberg, Timothy Leary and Richard Alpert (who would soon change his name to Ram Dass).

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