None

Thin Crust Moon

New data from NASA's GRAIL mission suggest that the crust of the Moon is thinner than we had thought. Is this idea consistent with the geological evidence?

None

The Mystery of Shackleton Crater

New information about the interior of the crater Shackleton at the south pole of the Moon sheds light on questions remaining about water on the Moon

None

That Sounds Familiar

New data from Mars suggest that it may have been hospitable to life in the past. Haven't we heard this before?

None

Geological sampling and planetary exploration

Samples from other worlds provide some key information on planetary evolution and history but are they the only way to obtain such knowledge?

None

Geological mapping of another world

Thanks to geologic mapping, we understood the story of the Moon well before we actually went there

None

Hugh L. Dryden and the American Space Program

Congress has proposed that the name of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center be re-named to honor Neil Armstrong. Should it?

None

How Are Places On The Moon Named?

The rules for naming features on the Moon are simple, but not always logical.

None

The Lunar Surface – What Lies Beneath

Gravity data from NASA's GRAIL mission show that deeply buried bodies of igneous rock in the crust can be detected from orbit.

None

Reflecting on the Ice of Mercury and the Moon

Recent data from the planet Mercury indicates that water ice is found near its poles. What does this mean for the Moon?

None

Technical Readiness

Using the material and energy resources of space could be a major game-changer for spaceflight. So why haven't we ever done it?

None

Ocean of Storms, Oceans of Argument

A new paper claims mineral evidence for the largest basin on the Moon -- is it true?

None

Water from the Sun

What is the ultimate source of the water found at the poles of the Moon? A new study of some lunar soil samples suggests a surprising answer

"True" color (left) and "false" color (right) images of the near side of the Moon from Clementine. "Blue" units in Mare Tranquillitatis (right middle of false color image) are ilmenite-rich lavas.

Once in a Blue Moon

What color is the Moon? The answer is not as straightforward as you might think

None

Hit-and-Run Science

Two new and very different scientific studies may revise our understanding of the Giant Impact that supposedly created the Moon

None

Free Enterprise and “New Space”

Is "New Space" free enterprise?

None

Passing of an Era

Neil Armstrong will always be remembered for his "one small step" but his contributions to spaceflight are numerous

None

A Cheap Date

Determining rock ages remotely would create new possibilities for planetary science

None

Scooping the Soviets

The radio telescope at England's Jodrell Bank Observatory got the news scoop of the century in the early days of the space race

None

Newt Space

Does the history of two early pioneers of aviation offer an analogy for spaceflight?

None

The Tale of Falcon 1

The development of SpaceX's Falcon 1 is a story of promise -- and partial fulfillment

loading icon