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photo contest slideshow
Temple in Kyoto, Japan (II)
On Top of the World
Autumn Flare at Duke Farms
The tree and the cheetah
Cyclists in the city at fall
Girl in Front of Barn Door
Golden fog
Quincy's Eyes
Heron Wading in Pond
BORO KACHARI TRIBEL DANCE
Good morning self
The Road to Ilulissat
Brachygrottis 0500B
Deadly streets
The Deli Grocery
Lifestyle
Milkyway
Reef Bay Trail Petroglyphs
Winston in focus
Portrait of Hugh Chipperfield
Civil War Cannon on Lookout Mountain in the morning.
A young giant
Coco - graffiti art
15th Annual Smithsonian.com Photo Contest
The Road to Ilulissat

Located approximately 150 miles north of the Arctic Circle, the ilulissat icefjord is the sea mouth of Sermeq Kujalleq, one of the fastest moving active glaciers in the world. Annually, it calves over 35 km3 of ice (10% of the production of all Greenland calf ice and more than any other glacier outside Antarctica). At its eastern end is the Jakobshavn Isbræ glacier, the most productive glacier in the northern hemisphere. The iceberg calves off around 20 billion tons of icebergs every year! Studied for over 250 years, this icefjord has helped to develop our understanding of climate change and icecap glaciology. The icefjord was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2004. Today, we got to hike the icefjord in Sermermiut. Two kilometres south of Ilulissat, Sermermiut was once amongst the largest settlements in Greenland with around 250 inhabitants. The hike began with a long, never ending, wooden platform

TAGS: Adventure, Greenland, Hiking, Travel

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Los Angeles, California, United States of America
Member since 2016
Photo Information
Copyright:
© Elissa Title.
All rights reserved.
Image Source: digital
Date Taken: 07.2017
Total Views: 25
Filed Under: Travel
Camera Information
Date Uploaded: Nov. 29, 2017, 3:44 p.m.
Camera Make: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS REBEL T4i
Focal Length: 18mm
Shutter Speed: 1/500
Aperture: f5.6
ISO: ISO100
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PHOTO LOCATION Greenland