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photo contest slideshow
A Blip in the Andes
"Dreamin'" of another sunrise like this one.
We are small
Overlooking the Andes
Man trekking through Cadillac Mountain
Napittachara waterfall moments
A rising sun on the Yellow Mountain
Spot light
Cold sunset
Girls need to be brave too.
Islamabad city at night from Monal restaurant.
Base Camp
above the cloud
Teufelsberg-Spy days-Under the same sky
Rocktop View of the Main Road
Silhouettes on Little Haystack
The South Sister reflected in Moraine Lake Oregon
A Gurung honey hunter climbs a rope ladder to begin the biannual honey harvest high up in the hills of the Annapurna ranges
The Precipice Trail in Acadia National Park
Going up
Night Miner
The Beauty of Ijen Crater
A mountain view in Peru
16th Annual Smithsonian.com Photo Contest
Base Camp

The mountain was created by the subduction of the Nazca Plate beneath the South American Plate. Aconcagua, used to be an active stratovolcano (from the Late Cretaceous or Early Paleocene through the Miocene), and consisted of several volcanic complexes, on the edge of a basin with a shallow sea. However, sometime in the Miocene, about 8 to 10 million years ago, the subduction angle started to decrease resulting in a stop of the melting and more horizontal stresses between the oceanic plate and the continent, causing the thrust faults that lifted Aconcagua up off its volcanic root. The rocks found on Aconcagua’s flanks are all volcanic and consist of lavas, breccias and pyroclastics. The shallow marine basin had already formed earlier (Triassic), even before Aconcagua arose as a volcano. However, volcanism has been present in this region for as long as this basin was around and volcanic deposits interfinger with marine deposits throughout the sequence. The colorful greenish, blueish and grey deposits that can be seen in the Horcones Valley and south of Puente Del Inca, are carbonates, limestones, turbidites and evaporates that filled this basin. The red colored rocks are intrusions, cinder deposits and conglomerates of volcanic origin

TAGS: Argentina, Camp, Climbing, Snow, Travel

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Esfahan, Iran
Member since 2017
Photo Information
Copyright:
© Amin Dehghan.
All rights reserved.
Image Source: digital
Date Taken: 12.2016
Filed Under: Travel
Camera Information
Date Uploaded: Nov. 23, 2018, 12:44 p.m.
Camera Make: Canon
Camera Model: Canon PowerShot D30
Focal Length: 5mm
Shutter Speed: 1/800
Aperture: f8
ISO: ISO100
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