Sustainable Travel Finalist
MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE SUPPORT OF
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A person's perception
The Haze. Singapore
Beam of light into the 9/11 memorial
Small Dog Big Shadow
Of Life and Death
Puddle People
Performing
Hydrangea taken at Bantry House, Ireland
What could be more American than Chinese food?
Blind Michelle
Antibes, France
Leatherback pair
Portra Jesus
orango
Bald Eagle in Winter Fog
Teijo Nationalpark
Haleiwa, Hawaii
White Bear meets little Girl
Fallberries
The Haze: Singapore
Man Vs. Hog
Happy High School Senior
Dusk on the River
13th Annual Smithsonian.com Photo Contest
Leatherback Pair

Sustainable travel is something we all should strive to consider and eventually adopt. From using less plastic on your travels to picking up just a little bit a trash along your way, there are so many ways we can help. Getting others involved doubles your impact and benefits our fragile world. As often as I can, I go out and explore the world’s oceans with my cameras. I also strive to document the work of others protecting and conserving our environment, specifically in the world of sea turtle conservation. During nesting season, I go out with our amazing biologists, scientists and volunteers who help to protect and document sea turtle habitats in South Florida. These turtles face a huge battle of survival on their upcoming "travels" and every person I can impact with their picture is a win!

Researchers, biologists and many volunteers across the east and west coasts of Florida and all around the world perform beach monitoring during sea turtle nesting season early in the morning. They mark the nests once the turtle has laid them during the night, identifying the species by the tracks. Once the researchers, biologists and volunteers see that a nest has hatched, they mark the nest. Three days later, the nest is dug up to record a number of important data points, depending on the researcher or organization.

Every once in a while there are a hatchlings at the bottom of the nest that never make it to the surface to emerge. These hatchlings are released early in the morning at sunrise or before (preferably) during the digs. Many times the hatchlings are too weak to be released, or it is too light out, and so they are brought to a sea turtle rehabilitation center or released later on by the researcher during the night.

While I was documenting the work of South Florida researchers, a handful of hatchling leatherback sea turtles were given a second chance at life. The way these two ended up walking out alongside each other was an amazing moment that I was able to witness and share.

This photo is a finalist in the Sustainable Travel category of our 13th Annual Photo Contest. See all 70 finalists here.

TAGS: Florida

photographer avatar
Boca Raton, Florida, United States of America
Member since 2015
Awards
Photo of the Day: 03.11.16 Finalist
Photo Information
Copyright:
© ben hicks.
All rights reserved.
Image Source: digital
Date Taken: 07.2015
Total Views: 7378
Total Favorites: 8
Filed Under: Sustainable Travel
Camera Information
Date Uploaded: Nov. 19, 2015, 12:08 p.m.
Camera Make:
Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Focal Length: 16mm
Shutter Speed: 1/8000
Aperture: f2.8
ISO: ISO400
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PHOTO LOCATION Palm Beach, Florida, United States of America