Wheeler/Stallard Museum

620 W. Bleeker St. , Aspen, CO 81611 - United States

970-925-3721

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The Wheeler/Stallard house is a Queen Anne style Victorian built in 1888. The first floor of the Museum is interpreted as a Victorian Aspen home and the second floor gallery features rotating exhibitions to explore area history.

In 1888, Jerome B. Wheeler built the home for his family in Aspen’s Victorian “West End” neighborhood. Despite his plans, his wife Harriet Macy Valentine Wheeler refused to leave their mansion in Manitou Springs, Colorado and the family never lived here. Edgar and Mary Ella Stallard moved into the house in 1905, eventually purchasing it in 1917. The family lived here for forty years. The house last served as the residence of the Aspen Institute’s president before the Aspen Historical Society purchased it in 1969.

Exhibits

On display in the second floor gallery of the Wheeler/Stallard Museum, Aspen Historical Society presents “bayer & bauhaus: how design shaped aspen” as part of Bauhaus 100: Aspen, a community-wide celebration of the centenary of the German art school “Bauhaus.” The exhibit delves into the profound, but often unnoticed influence of Herbert Bayer’s work on Aspen, Colorado. Following his arrival in 1946, Bayer’s Bauhaus ethos and artistic vision began to shape the modern aesthetic and way of life in the Aspen community. He pioneered historic preservation in the area, designed a Bauhaus-inspired campus at the Aspen Institute, influenced local architecture, built innovative earthworks and helped guide the community’s cultural and philosophic values. Aspen Historical Society’s never-before-exhibited Bayer collection offers a unique view into his extensive works – both fine art and commercial – sharing a glimpse into Bayer’s lasting impact through preliminary sketch studies, original prints, architectural drawings, graphic design works, historical photographs, and more.

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