Georgia's Old Governor's Mansion

120 S. Clarke Street, Milledgeville, GA 31061 - United States

478-445-4545

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Smithsonian Affiliate Museum

Completed in 1839, Georgia’s Old Governor’s Mansion is one of the finest examples of High Greek Revival architecture in the nation. Designed by noted architect Charles Clusky, an Irish immigrant, and built by Timothy Porter of Farmington, Connecticut, the Mansion looms over Milledgeville with its stately columns and imposing facade. Serving as the residence for Georgia’s chief executives for over thirty years, the Mansion’s history encompasses the antebellum, Civil War, and early Reconstruction phases of the state’s history. Such noted state leaders as George Crawford, Howell Cobb, and Joseph E. Brown resided in the building and used it as a stage for speeches and also to introduce guests of national standing.

The Old Governor’s Mansion also served as a stage on which many elements of the complex social issues of the antebellum period were played out. Slavery and the complexity of society and gender roles are among the issues that shape the history of the building and are explored in tandem with the issues of politics.

Beginning in the late 1990s, an initiative was begun to return the Mansion to its antebellum splendor. The Old Governor’s Mansion now serves as an historic house museum whose mission is to care for, collect, interpret, and exhibit items (including artifacts, structures, and gardens) that illustrate the history of the site and its inhabitants during the years the Mansion was the official residence of Georgia’s governors (1839-1868) in order to make these objects available to the public for educational benefit. Tours focus on the history of the building, its occupants both free and enslaved, and the myriad complexities of Antebellum society in Georgia and its history.

The Old Governor’s Mansion was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1973. The Mansion is an accredited museum of the American Alliance of Museums and a Smithsonian Affiliate.

Exhibits

Tours will focus on the history of the mansion, its occupants, and the collections contained within the museum.

Participation in Museum Day is open to any tax-exempt or governmental museum or cultural venue on a voluntary basis. Smithsonian magazine encourages museum visitation, but is not responsible for and does not endorse the content of the participating museums and cultural venues, and does not subsidize museums that participate.