Southeastern Railway Museum

3595 Buford Highway, Duluth, GA 30096 - United States

(770) 476-2013

Website

The Southeastern Railway Museum is designated Georgia’s official transportation history museum and occupies a 35-acre site in Duluth, Georgia, in northeast suburban Atlanta. In operation since 1970, the museum features about 90 items of rolling stock including historic Pullman cars and classic steam locomotives.

In addition to train cars, visitors will find a wide variety of antique buses and vehicles, railroad artifacts, and an extensive archive. The restored 1871 Duluth passenger train depot is also located on the grounds. Visitors can take a train ride on restored cabooses or hop on a miniature train.

Exhibits

BUILDING ONE
Inside the main exhibit space is the 1911 Pullman private car ‘Superb’, used by President Harding on a journey across the country in 1923. Visitors can also climb inside a Pullman sleeping car and a locomotive that once pulled passenger trains to Key West on the “railroad that went to sea”. The exhibit hall features railroad dining car china, uniforms of the train crew, model railroad cars, and other railroad artifacts.

BUILDING TWO
Next to the main building, visitors can stroll through a Railway Post Office car, tour the business car that helped bring the Olympics to Atlanta, sit at the tables of a dining car used by FDR, and more.

RAIL & TRANSIT EXHIBIT BUILDING
Visitors can board vintage transit equipment from the 1940s to present day inside the museum’s newest building, including city buses, a trackless trolley, and more. Inside the caboose, guests can walk in the footsteps of a freight train conductor.

OUTDOOR EXHIBITS
The restored 1871 Duluth passenger depot sits along the tracks of the miniature park train. Standard-gauge train rides are also available on restored cabooses. The most enthusiastic train lovers might enjoy taking a cab ride with the engineer up in the locomotive!

Location

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