Poster House

119 West 23rd Street, New York, NY 10011 - United States

917-722-2439

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Poster House is the first museum in the United States dedicated exclusively to posters.

Through exhibitions, events, and publications, Poster House presents a global view of posters from their earliest appearance in the late 1800s, to their present-day use. Poster House takes its mission from the medium, aiming to engage and educate all audiences as we investigate this large format graphic design and its public impact.

Exhibits

Exhibitions Running at Poster House from January 16 – May 3, 2020

The Sleeping Giant: Posters & The Chinese Economy explores China’s economic relationship with the world through poster design.

By the 20th century, Western powers had already forced their way into the Chinese market. Throughout the 1920s and 1930s, foreign and local companies rapidly expanded their commercial activities in China and experimented with Western marketing ideas. The most popular posters, called yuefenpai (calendar posters), were a marketing sensation and became key publicity tools to promote everyday products including cigarettes, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals.

In 1949, with the establishment of the People’s Republic under Mao Zedong, public posters made a stark turn towards Socialist Realism. Later in the 1980s and 90s, Chinese graphic design embraced a more internationally modern look as globalism brought the far reaches of the world together.

And

The Swiss Grid: Perfected in Switzerland during the 1950s, the grid became the backbone of poster design in the latter half of the 20th century. Still used today, it brought order and uniformity to compositions, allowing for brands to communicate clearly to an increasingly global audience. This didactic show introduces viewers to the development of the Swiss grid, the two schools that mastered it, and how it came to define contemporary advertising.

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