Museum of the Oregon Territory

211 Tumwater Dr., Oregon City, OR 97045 - United States

503-655-5574

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Overlooking the Willamette Falls and the Willamette River, the Museum of the Oregon Territory is a history museum which features exhibits on Clackamas county history documented in photographs and artifacts. Discover what life was like in Oregon before and after the pioneers re-settled the Willamette Valley area, from the practices and culture of local first-nation peoples, to the industrial heritage of America’s second-largest waterfall.

Exhibits

(NEW) LINES ON THE LAND: MAPPING CLACKAMAS COUNTY
Our new rotating exhibit, “Lines on the Land: Mapping Clackamas County,” is now open and will be on display until December, 2020. Using historic maps, survey equipment and journals, this exhibit will introduce you to the formation of the current boundaries of Clackamas County. Explore the history of people and events that were changed by these lines on the land.

THE NATIVE PEOPLES GALLERY
Before pioneers arrived, indigenous communities thrived. As a point close to river convergence, the Willamette Falls was an important site for tribes across the region, acting as a center for trade. Artifacts, dioramas, and photographs help paint a picture of indigenous life in the Willamette valley, both past and present.

LIFE IN THE TERRITORY
The Life in the Territory exhibit explores how re-settlers lived and worked the land after coming through the Oregon Trail. Featured is the last surviving copy of the original Plat Map of San Francisco, originally filed in Oregon City in 1850.

PGE THEATER/PGE PRESENTS
Thanks to the generous support of Portland General Electric (PGE) (through our corporate partnership program), guests are invited to discover how the development of power production at Willamette Falls transformed our region.

PGE HANDS-ON HISTORY HALL
The PGE Hands-On History Hall provides a variety of activities that allows visitors young and old the opportunity get “hands-on” with history.

KAEGI PHARMACY
Featuring the antique collection of brothers John and Richard Kaegi, the exhibit loosely reconstructs the original Kaegi Pharmacy (1927 - 1989) and illustrates what a pharmacy could have looked like in the days of Herbert Hoover.

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