John Cabot House

117 Cabot St., Beverly, MA 01915 - United States

978-922-1186

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The 1781 John Cabot House tells the story of the merchant and privateer owner John Cabot as well as the broader Beverly story. Decorative objects brought back from Asia by Beverly merchants; the papers of William Bartlett, George Washington’s naval agent; paintings by artists such as Gilbert Stuart, James Frothingham, Frank Benson, Luke Prince, Frederick Coffay Yohn and more than 500,000 images in various formats, such as prints, negatives, slides, glass negatives, daguerreotypes, film, and videotape of people, places and events related to Beverly and the region are among the treasures held by Historic Beverly.

Exhibits

Emerging from Salem’s Shadow
Beverly’s economy remained focused on maritime trades and agriculture, but new trades emerged during the period. Clockmakers, cabinet makers, silversmiths and other artisans created objects for an emerging well-to-do class. A spirit of change and possibility emerged in the 18th century, with profound consequences for our local community and America.

From Revolution to Republic
The tumultuous 40 years between 1775 and 1815 included years of war, epidemics, sacrifice and suffering. But they also saw the excitement of the birth of the new nation, with new opportunities both in politics and business.

Beverly Bank: An Early American Bank, Est. 1802
Displaying original documents and artifacts, this exhibit uses the history of the bank, which began at the Cabot House, to explore the role of banks in the development of a strong financial system in the United States.

Location

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