East Jersey Old Town Village

1050 River Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 - United States

732-745-3030

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Free Everyday

East Jersey Old Town Village is a collection of historic structures that were relocated to Johnson Park in Piscataway. The village is comprised of sixteen reconstructed and replica 18th and 19th century structures that represent architecture typical of farm and merchant communities once found in the Raritan Valley.

Buildings include, the Indian Queen Tavern, the Farley Blacksmith Shop, the Williamson Wheelwright Shop, the Smalleytown Schoolhouse, the Three Mile Run Church, the homes of early settlers and outbuildings.

Visitors today can explore the site and meet the historical interpreters that bring the Village to life through their historic trades and crafts. A gateway site for the Crossroads of the American Revolution, National Heritage Area, situated along the Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail, the Village offers awarding winning exhibits, living history, and seasonal programs.

FREE ADMISSION - Open Year-Round, excluding Holidays, Rutgers Football game days and Rutgers graduation

Historical Interpreters on-site April - October.

Check out the Liberty Base Ball Club and see how base ball was played in the 1800's.

Text CULTURE to 56512 for hours information or contact artsandhistory@co.middlesex.nj.us or call 732-745-3030.

Exhibits

Raritan Landing, once a bustling port on the Raritan River, has all but disappeared from the landscape. Only the names Landing Lane and the Landing Lane Bridge hint at the community that once flourished and spread to the east and west along River Road.

Raritan Landing was dense with businesses and rich with a variety of trades and skills. Here imports arrived from Europe and the Caribbean, while goods and produce of New Jersey were loaded on ships for export. It was exciting, international and cosmopolitan. But the Revolutionary War took its toll: the Delaware and Raritan Canal siphoned trade and New Brunswick won the coveted terminus of the railroads. These developments tolled a death knell for the Landing.
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Now a permanent exhibit, we invite you to enter the world of Raritan Landing, as told through the objects and artifacts of its citizens, the soldiers who camped here, and the stories uncovered through archaeology.

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