Daura Museum of Art at University of Lynchburg

1501 Lakeside Drive,Daura Museum of Art, Lynchburg, VA 24501 - United States

434-544-8595

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The Daura Museum at the University of Lynchburg was established in 1974 as the University’s art gallery. The gallery was dedicated in 1990 as the Daura Gallery in memory of the Catalan-American painter Pierre Daura (1896-1976) and his wife, Louise Blair Daura, and in 2020 became the Daura Museum of Art.

The collection of works by European and American artists, African art, and world cultures now includes more than 2,500 paintings, drawings, prints, and sculpture.

Exhibits

15 MINUTES OF FAME: ANDY WARHOL AND THE CULT OF CELEBRITY
AUGUST 10 – SEPTEMBER 24
From 1970 until his death in 1987, Andy Warhol was rarely without a Polaroid SX series camera.
This exhibition provides a glimpse of the artist’s obsessive recording of his life outside the studio,
including his nightlife, travel, and activities on the street. The camera, which he called his “date,”
allowed him to engage his subjects as he snapped tens of thousands of photos of boyfriends,
socialites, and celebrities. These photographs were at the core of his artistic process, as they served
as the basis for in-studio portraits of the beautiful, rich, and powerful. “The Polaroid gets rid of
everybody’s wrinkles, sort of simplifies the face,” he noted. “I try to make everybody look great.”
The photographs in this exhibition were donated to the Daura Museum of Art by the Andy Warhol
Photographic Legacy Program of the Andy Warhol Foundation.

GROUND ZERO WITH PETER TURNLEY: A PHOTOGRAPHER’S PRESENCE ON 9/11
AUGUST 10 – OCTOBER 14
Twenty years ago, Nearly 3,000 people died as a direct result of coordinated attacks against the United
States by terrorists who hijacked four passenger jets that crashed into the World Trade Center buildings
in New York, the Pentagon and a field in rural Pennsylvania. Photo-journalist Peter Turnley arrived at the
site of the World Trade Center - “Ground Zero” - at about 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, September 11, 2001.  “I
pulled up to a police barricade that was turning all cars away and showed my NATO press pass from
work in Kosovo,” he said. “The police looked at the pass, shrugged their shoulders, and said hesitantly,
‘go ahead.’” He worked steadily over the next 10 days, documenting the devastation and the courage of
first responders and rescue workers, and grief of families and friends of the dead.

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