Connecticut Historical Society

1 Elizabeth Street, Hartford, CT 06105 - United States

860-236-5621

Website

Facebook

Twitter

Smithsonian Affiliate Museum

A private, nonprofit, educational organization established in 1825, the Connecticut Historical Society is the state’s official historical society and one of the oldest in the nation. The CHS houses a museum, library, and the Edgar F. Waterman Research Center that are open to the public and funded by private contributions. The CHS’s collection includes more than 4 million manuscripts, graphics, books, artifacts, and other historical materials accessible at our campus and on loan at other organizations.

The CHS collection, programs and exhibits help Connecticut residents connect with each other, have conversations that shape our communities, and make informed decisions based on our past and present.

Exhibits

Mas: Costumes from Hartford’s West Indian Community
This exhibition showcases Trinidad-style carnival costumes (Mas) made by Hartford teens during the summer 2019 Mas Camp, the ninth year of a collaboration between the Connecticut Cultural Heritage Arts Program (CCHAP) and the Connecticut International Cultural Carnival Association (CICCA) under the direction of Linford “Junior” Miller. The colorful and elaborate costumes on display are similar to those worn in West Indian celebrations around the world, and will be presented by the teens at Hartford’s Taste of the Caribbean Festival and the West Indian Parade this summer.

Making Connecticut
Don’t miss this exhibit 400+ years in the making! Colorful, interactive, and filled with more than 500 historic objects, images, and documents, Making Connecticut is the story of all the people of Connecticut, from the 1500s through today. Themes of daily life, clothing, transportation, sports and leisure, work, and social change run throughout the exhibit. Hands-on activities for kids (and adults!) include working a World War II assembly line, hand stenciling designs for a 19th-century chair, sewing a Native American moccasin, replacing bobbins in a textile mill, and cooking a meal and setting the table in both a colonial and a 1980s kitchen. Come be surprised, inspired, and amused as you explore our state’s past and your own place in “Making Connecticut.”

Location

Participation in Museum Day is open to any tax-exempt or governmental museum or cultural venue on a voluntary basis. Smithsonian magazine encourages museum visitation, but is not responsible for and does not endorse the content of the participating museums and cultural venues, and does not subsidize museums that participate.