Chandler Museum

Chandler Museum

300 S Chandler Village Drive, Chandler, AZ 85226 - United States

480-782-2717

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Free Everyday

The Chandler Museum is a cultural destination unlike any other with engaging, community-focused programs and forums, as well as world-class traveling exhibits.

The museum is a 10,000-square-foot facility just north of the historic McCullough-Price house with nearly 13,000 square feet of outdoor spaces, including a 10,000 square-foot courtyard that ties the two buildings together and provides a shaded gathering place for visitors and outdoor programming.

Renovations to the historic house created a formal state-of-the-art research and archive site for the Museum while maintaining its status on the National Register of Historic Places. Together, the project establishes a City of Chandler iconic cultural facility with easy to access to the 101 and 202 freeways, in close proximity to vast shopping and dining options, and a growing area that is being developed for residents and tourism.

Exhibits

Bigger than Boxing: Zora Folley and the 1967 Heavyweight Title
Aug. 25, 2020 - Feb. 13, 2022

March 22, 1967, Madison Square Garden, New York City. Two men face off in the ring for the Heavyweight Championship of the World. In the blue corner, the Champ, Muhammad Ali. In the red corner, the Challenger from Chandler, Arizona, Zora Folley.
What follows is a fight at the crossroads of race, religion, sport, and the politics of the 1960s. Bigger than Boxing features the stories of these two boxers, the circumstances that weighed heavy on each man, and the fight that was a turning point in both of their careers.

Black and White in Black and White: Images of Dignity, Hope, and Diversity in America
June 29 - Oct. 17, 2021

At the turn of the 20th-century, many African Americans across the country embraced the “New Negro Movement,” which set the stage for the Harlem Renaissance. No one better captured the essence of this time of advancement than African American photographer John Johnson. This exhibition includes thirty-one large-scale black and white photographs captured by Johnson from 1910 to 1925.

Black and White in Black and White: Images of Dignity, Hope, and Diversity in America is curated by Douglas Keister, presented with support from California State University, Chico, and traveled by Exhibit Envoy.

September 11, 2001: The Day That Changed the World
Sept. 11 - Oct. 10

Twenty years after the attacks, with terrorism still a threat today, the events of 9/11 and its aftermath remind us that we may never be able to prevent all the actions of people intent on harming others, but we do have control over how we respond to such events. Whether by volunteering in our local communities, serving our nation in the military, caring for the sick, or through other efforts, all of us can help build the world in which we want to live. As we witness history unfolding in our own time, the ways we choose to respond—both large and small—can demonstrate the best of human nature after even the worst of days.

This educational exhibition recounts the events of September 11, 2001, through the personal stories of those who witnessed and survived the attacks. Told across 14 posters, this exhibition includes archival photographs and images of artifacts from the 9/11 Memorial Museum’s permanent collection.

This 9/11 Memorial & Museum curated exhibition reflects the core pillars of commemoration, education, and inspiration as we prepare to observe the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

Participation in Museum Day is open to any tax-exempt or governmental museum or cultural venue on a voluntary basis. Smithsonian magazine encourages museum visitation, but is not responsible for and does not endorse the content of the participating museums and cultural venues, and does not subsidize museums that participate.