Articles

Etching of Joseph O. Eaton's portrait of Herman Melville

During Melville's Lifetime, Fame Proved Elusive for a Literary Giant

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)

A Vibrant New Heart For the Art in San Francisco

A short walk from the uphill end of the Fisherman's Wharf trolley line is a former working-class neighborhood that is the city's new home for the arts

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The Decorative Art of India's Painted Prayers

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Review of 'Measure for Measure: A Musical History of Science'

Review of 'Measure for Measure: A Musical History of Science'

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It's Hard to Believe One Man Held Sway Over All This Land

But it's true. In the mid-1800s Lucien Maxwell, a dauntless former mountain man, ruled a huge chunk of New Mexico and lower Colorado

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One Thousand and One Ways of Saying Uncle

Sam meddles shamelessly in U.S. politics and carries on with Miss Liberty, but nobody knows for sure exactly where he came from

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Smithsonian Perspectives

As part of our 150th-anniversary celebration, we're going to take 150 museum treasures on the road

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Around the Mall & Beyond

The Smithsonian Associates have a 'national treasure' in their midst, but shhh, don't tell...

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The Dying Tecumseh and the Birth of a Legend

A sculpture in the Smithsonian collection reveals much about how the Indians of the West were viewed in the early ages of the United States

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En Garde! Maybe M. Emile Was a Lousy Hairdresser, But He Gave His Place Tone

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Crash Dummies, Taking the Hard Knocks For All of Us

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My Dog Has Fleas, Also My Cat, My Bird, My...

These tiny prehistoric parasites have evolved a bold array of weapons, the better to torture their hosts

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When It Comes to Sports For The Brain, Everyone's a Winner

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On Loan From the White House, a Collection of 77 Craft Artists' Works is at the National Museum of American Art

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Masters of the Quick Guffaw

Gag writers and cartoonists are good pen pals —as long as they can get a laugh in seven seconds (tick, tick . . .)

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Mondrian and the Eternal Rectangle

In search of the transcendent, the Dutch painter created grids of red, blue and yellow that are very much with us

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Review of 'The Hot Zone'

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'America Beats By Far Anything,' Said the Ex-POW

In WWII, thousands of captive Germans found our prison camps so hospitable that they later became U.S. citizens

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Smithsonian Perspectives

The Festival of American Folklife is a popular model for presenting grass-roots culture to the public

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Around the Mall & Beyond

In 1939 Moritz Schoenberger, a Hungarian Jew living in Vienna, wanted to join his family in America. His ordeal is told at the National Postal Museum

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