Louisiana Overview

smithsonian.com

Over millennia, the Mississippi River carried layers of sediment downstream to form a vast delta, with swamps, bayous and natural levees. Much of this region became Louisiana, home to a unique American culture. There, Spanish, French and African-American food, music and language combined to create a distinctive way of life.

The ELsong Gardens at the Biedenharn Museum & Gardens in Monroe. (Courtesy of the Louisiana Office of Tourism)
Carriage rides are a good way to enjoy the Spanish-French architecture in New Orleans’ French Quarter. (Courtesy of the Louisiana Office of Tourism)
Café du Monde in New Orleans’ French Quarter is a local hotspot known for its French-style beignets and café au lait. (Courtesy of the Louisiana Office of Tourism)
High on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River stands Louisiana's Old State Capitol. The Gothic architectural treasure, located in Baton Rouge, is 150 years old. (Courtesy of the Louisiana Office of Tourism)
The Oak Alley Plantation in Vacherie is now a historic bed and breakfast. (Courtesy of the Louisiana Office of Tourism)
The Global Wildlife Center in Folsom is home to more than 3,000 exotic and endangered animals. (Courtesy of the Louisiana Office of Tourism)
The Black Bayou at sunset. (Courtesy of the Louisiana Office of Tourism)
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