Weekend Events: Celebrate Halloween at the Smithsonian and a Printmaking Workshop

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Friday, October 22: Boo at the Zoo

Perfect for persons ages two to 12, the 11th annual Boo at the Zoo provides families with a safe, fun and educational way to celebrate Halloween. Dress up and step on out to haunt the National Zoo where there will be 40 treat stations featuring an assortment of candy and snacks in addition to animal encounters and keeper talks. Tickets are required. Rates are: $30 general admission; $20 for members. Please visit the Boo at the Zoo website for detailed information on where you can purchase tickets. This event will repeat on October 23 and 24. National Zoo, 5:30-8:30 PM.

Saturday, October 23: Air and Scare Family Day

Come haunt the friendly skies at the National Air and Space Museum’s Stephen F. Udvar-Hazy Center! Arrive decked out in your Halloween regalia for indoor trick-or-treating, creepy crafts and other fun indoor activities. For the littlest members of your ghoulish brood, there will be story times and opportunities to play dress up. This event is free, but there is a $15 parking fee per vehicle. Public transit options are also available. Udvar-Hazy Center, 2:00-8:00 PM

Sunday, October 24: Printmaking Workshop with Joe Feddersen

Give in to your creative side and get your hands a little dirty! Artist Joe Feddersen will introduce you to printmaking by way of a hands-on workshop for kids and families. Free, but class size is limited to 15 persons and you must register online to participate. (There is a "Sign Up" link at the bottom of the page.) If you can't make it to this workshop, worry not. It repeats today at 2:00, so register online if you want to attend the later session. Free. American Indian Museum, 11:00 AM-1:00 PM.

For updates on all exhibitions and events, visit our companion site goSmithsonian.com

About Jesse Rhodes

Jesse Rhodes is an editorial assistant for Smithsonian magazine. Before he became an editorial assistant, Jesse worked at the Library of Congress Publishing Office, where he was a contributor to the Library of Congress World War II Companion.

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