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Hurry In! Exhibitions Closing in September

Don't miss out on these world-class exhibits, closing soon at the Smithsonian museums:Closing 9/06 - "Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition 2009," National Portrait GalleryThe National Portrait Gallery presents 49 of the finalists' works that were selected from the second triennial Outwin Boocheve...

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Dad by Stanley Rayfield; "La Rêve du Feu, The Dream of Fire" by Shunk-Kender*; "Carter" by Joan Hall; “Jeanne-Claude in cab of Truck” byWolfgang Volz;




Don't miss out on these world-class exhibits, closing soon at the Smithsonian museums:



Closing 9/06 - "Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition 2009," National Portrait Gallery



The National Portrait Gallery presents 49 of the finalists' works that were selected from the second triennial Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition. Dave Woody, winner of the competition, received the grand prize of $25,000 and an opportunity to create a portrait for the Portrait Gallery's permanent collection. The competition invited artists working in the figurative arts to submit portraits of people close to them. Submissions were accepted in all visual arts media, including film, video, and digital animation. Through January 18, 2010, the public can vote online or on-site for the artwork to receive the People's Choice Award.



Closing 9/12 - "Yves Klein: With the Void, Full Powers," Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden



The first American retrospective in nearly 30 years of this highly influential French artist's career examines his life and work from the mid-1950s to his untimely death in 1962. Artist, composer, judo master, Rosicrucian, proto-conceptualist, and performance artist, Klein was a multifaceted talent who believed in the transformative power of art. In his series, including the Monochromes, Anthropometries, Cosmogonies, Air Architecture, Fire Paintings, Sponge Reliefs, and Actions, Klein sought to place the immaterial at the heart of his work.



Closing 9/26 - "Christo and Jean-Claude: Remembering the 'Running Fence'," American Art Museum



On view are nearly 50 preparatory drawings and collages, along with photographs, film, and components, that document the creation and installation of Christo and Jeanne-Claude's epic project the Running Fence, Sonoma and Marin Counties, California, 1972-76, a white fabric and steel-pole fence, 24 1/2 miles long and 18 feet high, that ran across the properties of 59 ranchers in Sonoma and Marin Counties north of San Francisco. The project attracted far wider public involvement than any previous work of art, including 18 public hearings, three sessions in the Superior Court of California, and the first environmental impact report ever done for a work of art. Paid for entirely by the artists, the Running Fence existed for only two weeks and survives today as a memory and through the artwork and documentation of the artists.



Closing 9/26 - "From FDR to Obama: Presidents on TIME," National Portrait Gallery



Regardless of how newsworthy a person may be, there is no magic formula for getting one's picture on the cover of Time magazine, with one exception: the president of the United States. Founded in 1923, Time has put on its cover all incumbent presidents from Warren Harding to Barack Obama, with the exception of Herbert Hoover. Beginning with Franklin Roosevelt, this exhibition explores the modern presidency through the covers of America's oldest and most recognized weekly news magazine. The show includes approximately 30 works of presidential cover art, representing a variety of mediums, from traditional oil paintings to a pop-art sculpture bust of Richard Nixon made from strips of newspaper headlines.



*Private Collection. © 2010 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris. Photo by Shunk-Kender, © Roy Lichtenstein Foundation, courtesy Yves Klein Archives
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