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The Closest Thing in Real Life to Myst’s Wormhole Book

A hand-built computer-in-a-book lets you play Myst in a replica linking book

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The artfully re-created linking book. The Myst lettering is 24-carat gold. Photo: Mike Ando

In the 1993 video game Myst, players come across artifacts known as “linking books.” Myst was an expansive adventure and puzzle-based game that saw players explore a mysterious island. These tomes spoke to the player, providing vital information and, says Gizmag, were used to “transport people to other worlds known… as Ages.”

Example of a linking book:

But now, says Gizmag, Australia-based Mike Ando, who goes by the name RIUM+, has designed and built a linking book that doesn’t just talk back but actually allows you to play Myst through a touchscreen and computer built right into a book. The replica linking book, says Ando, is “made out of a copy of the same book Cyan originally scanned as a texture reference.”

The sequel to Myst, known as Riven, was well known at its launch for the mere fact that the game sprawled across a whopping five CDs. Ando’s construction manages to house not only Myst and Riven, but every other game in the Myst series.

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About Colin Schultz
Colin Schultz

Colin Schultz is a freelance science writer and editor based in Toronto, Canada. He blogs for Smart News and contributes to the American Geophysical Union. He has a B.Sc. in physical science and philosophy, and a M.A. in journalism.

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