Amazing Shots Captured by Google Street View | Smart News | Smithsonian
Current Issue
October 2014 magazine cover
Subscribe

Save 81% off the newsstand price!

Keeping you current

Amazing Shots Captured by Google Street View

One artist scours Google Street View for shocking, beautiful and amazing images

smithsonian.com

Artist John Rafman scours Google Street View for incredible shots. Image: John Rafman

From allegedly cheating husbands, to drug deals in action, to embarrassing moments, Google Street View has captured some interesting snapshots of human life. Artist Jon Rafman, has made it his goal to scour the Earth and compile those fascinating images. This list of 30, seen at Demilked, is full of truly amazing shots. And there are more at is his website.

You can see everything from a tiger wandering about a parking lot:

To a seemingly escaped prisoner:

To a street gang stopping cars on the road:

To a child hiding behind a garbage pail:

To a reindeer fleeing the oncoming car:

Rafman calls his project 9-eyes, after the nine cameras that each Google Streetview car has mounted on top. He has blurred out the faces of people who appear in the photographs. (Street View has been caught in a debate about privacy since it launched.) The images show people of all walks of life, doing all sorts of things — some mundane, others extreme. From a group of young men lined up against a wall by the police, to prostitutes waiting on corners, to small children wielding guns. This is the world we live in, as seen by a car simply driving by.

Update: If it seemed unlikely that a tiger would be wandering around a parking lot…well, it is. Alas, that tiger is not a live tiger but, as a crisper shot reveals, one made of fiberglass.)

More from Smithsonian.com:

Google Street View Trike: Nominate the National Mall

National Mall, a Finalist for a Google Trike Visit

Tags
About Rose Eveleth
Rose Eveleth

Rose Eveleth is a writer for Smart News and a producer/designer/ science writer/ animator based in Brooklyn. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Scientific American, Story Collider, TED-Ed and OnEarth.

Read more from this author |

Comment on this Story

comments powered by Disqus