Hubble Telescope Gets Back to Work | Science | Smithsonian
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Hubble Telescope Gets Back to Work

Yesterday, NASA celebrated the rejuvenation of the Hubble Space Telescope by releasing the first batch of images to come from the satellite since it was upgraded in May. That’s when astronauts installed two new instruments—the Wide Field Camera 3 and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph—and repaired two...

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Yesterday, NASA celebrated the rejuvenation of the Hubble Space Telescope by releasing the first batch of images to come from the satellite since it was upgraded in May. That’s when astronauts installed two new instruments—the Wide Field Camera 3 and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph—and repaired two others.



NASA scientists have been calibrating the instruments since then, and they even took an impressive photo of Jupiter’s new black spot, the site of a recent impact, as a test. The upgrade—which gives the 19-year-old Hubble a total of 13 instrument channels—will allow researchers to pursue a wide range of observations, including Kuiper belt objects at the edge of our solar system, infant galaxies from when the universe was less than 500 million years old and the atmospheres of extrasolar planets.



With Hubble’s new lease on life, the telescope promises more years of amazing discoveries, perhaps even more amazing than those that have already come to pass. (Hint: click on the photos to see larger versions.)



Butterfly Emerges from Stellar Demise in Planetary Nebula NGC 6302



Galactic Wreckage in Stephan's Quintet (Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team)



Jet in Carina (Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team)



WFPC2 Image of Eta Carinae



Colorful Stars Galore Inside Globular Star Cluster Omega Centauri



All images credit NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team.
About Sarah Zielinski
Sarah Zielinski

Sarah Zielinski is an award-winning science writer and editor. She is a contributing writer in science for Smithsonian.com and blogs at Wild Things, which appears on Science News.

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