Videos | Smithsonianhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/rss/videos/RSS feed for the videosenMon, 27 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Marianne North's Obsession With the Carnivorous Pitcher Planthttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/marianne-norths-obsession-with-the-carnivor/Painter Marianne North's obsession with local Borneo vegetation led her to one of the most unusual and rare plants in the world: the flesh-eating pitcher plant, located deep in the forests of Kuching.Mon, 27 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Lou Dogshttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/mp-31-617-lou-dogsmp4/Credit: Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-MuseumWed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Blimphttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/31-mp-614-blimpmp4/Credit: Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-MuseumWed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Grandkidshttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/31-mp-612-grandkidsmp4/Credit: Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-MuseumWed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Easterhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/31-mp-617-eastermp4/Credit: Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-MuseumWed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Hooverballhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/31-mp-617-hooverballmp4/Credit: Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-MuseumWed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Alonzo Gardenershttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/31-mp-617-alonzo-gardenersmp4/Credit: Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-MuseumWed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Fishinghttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/31-mp-611-fishingmp4/Credit: Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-MuseumWed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Killer Whales in Kamchatka Watershttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/killer-whales-in-kamchatka-waters/In 2003, a net encircled members of several pods of killer whales in Kamchatka waters. The hunters had no experience in capturing orcas, and as a result, several whales became entangled in the net. Video by Far East Russia Orca Project, courtesy of Erich HoytWed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Killer Whales Perform at the Moscow Aquariumhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/killer-whales-perform-at-the-moscow-aquarium/Killer whales perform at the Moscow aquarium, Moskvarium, which opened in 2015. Video by RuptlyWed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000The Complex Maneuvering of WWI's Biggest Naval Battlehttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/the-complex-maneuvering-of-wwis-biggest-nav/On May 31, 1916, a small skirmish between British and German warships would pave the way for the biggest naval confrontation of WWI--the infamous Battle of Jutland.Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Feuding Iguanas and Giant Rodents Rule This Cuban Islandhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/feuding-iguanas-and-giant-rodents-rule-this/In the Jardines de la Reina, an archipelago in the southern part of Cuba, two species have managed to co-exist in not-quite-harmony: the endangered Cuban iguana and the hutia, a type of large rodent.Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Fascinating: How Transparent Glass Frogs Matehttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/fascinating-how-transparent-glass-frogs-mate/Rainy season is also mating season for the glass frogs of Panama. First, the female collects water from a leaf in order to hydrate the eggs inside her. She then releases them for the male to fertilize.Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Lionfish Are a Plague. Can Training Sharks to Eat Them Work?http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/lionfish-are-a-plague-can-training-sharks-t/Lionfish, which are native to the Indo-Pacific but were accidentally introduced to the Caribbean, are decimating native fish species. To help limit their damage, scientists are teaching sharks to prey on them.Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000The $15,000 Robotic Cleaning That Removes a Ship's Sludgehttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/innovation/the-15000-robotic-cleaning-that-removes-a/The remote-controlled robot that cleans the hull of a ship as big as Tonsberg costs $15,000 for its services. But with a soccer field's worth of sea guck to be removed, it certainly earns its keep.Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Lava Stream From Kilauea Volcanohttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/lava-stream-from-kilauea-volcano/ A massive lava stream from Kilauea Volcano flows into the ocean from a lava tube at the Kamokuna ocean entry on the southeast side of the Big Island at sunrise. Credit Elyse ButlerTue, 21 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Explore South Africa's Cradle of Humankindhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/south-africa-tourism/explore-south-africas-cradle-of-humankind/Fri, 17 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Why 10 Daily Tons of Ant Poop Keep This Rainforest Thrivinghttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/why-10-daily-tons-of-ant-poop-keep-this-rain/The soil in the rainforests of Barro Colorado is packed with nutrients, but where does it come from? The answer lies high up in the canopy, where a remarkable, prolific species of nest-building ants drops its waste.Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000What It Was Like to Be on the Ground at Iwo Jimahttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/what-it-was-like-to-be-on-the-ground-at-iwo/Weapon Hunter host Paul Shull is tracing the history of the iconic American gun known as the Stinger. In the process, he meets Robert Mueller, a veteran who survived the battle of Iwo Jima, where the Stinger made its debut.Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Elephants Can Afford to Be Picky About This Kind of Fruithttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/elephants-can-afford-to-be-picky-about-this/A single marula tree can provide up to 1.5 tons of fruit each season--as much as 90,000 fruits. That works well for the average elephant who needs to consume 6% of its own body weight each day and prefers only the ripest fruits.Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000What Do Native American Carvings in French WWI Quarries Mean?http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/what-do-native-american-carvings-in-french-w/Why is there a Native American canoe carved in an abandoned quarry inhabited by U.S. soldiers during WWI? The answer leads back to Point Pleasant, Maine--home of the Passamaquoddy Tribe.Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000What Did WWI Soldiers Leave Behind in Their Secret Bunkers?http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/what-did-wwi-soldiers-leave-behind-in-their/The French-German border is littered with as many as 500 underground sites used during World War I. Researcher Jeff Gusky explores them and finds a vivid record of the lives the U.S. and German soldiers who fought here led.Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000The Making of “Beyond Curie: Celebrating Badass Women in Science”http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/the-making-of-beyond-curie-celebrating-bad/Credit: Amanda PhingbodhipakkiyaThu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000How Buddha's Hair Inspired Burma's Most Sacred Sitehttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/how-buddhas-hair-inspired-burmas-most-sacr/The Shwedagon Pagoda is the most sacred site in Burma. Its origins can be traced back to the first millennium, when a king was inspired by a legend involving eight strands of Buddha's hair.Wed, 15 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000What It Took to Travel the World Solo as a 19th-Century Womanhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/what-it-took-to-travel-the-world-solo-as-a-1/Marianne North was not your typical Victorian noblewoman content to simply enjoy the comforts of British high society. Instead, an itch for traveling propelled her all over the globe, visiting 12 countries in just six years.Mon, 13 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000How the Desert Oryx Stops Its Brain From Fryinghttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/how-the-desert-oryx-stops-its-brain-from-frying/How does the desert-dwelling oryx survive a body temperature that would kill other mammals? The answer lies in a panting mechanism that lowers the temperature of the blood in its head.Mon, 13 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000What Lions Look for in the Perfect Preyhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/what-lions-look-for-in-the-perfect-prey/For lions hunting buffalo in the Manyeleti, calculation is always at play: An adult male buffalo may be harder to bring down, but offers 500 pounds more meat than a female.Mon, 13 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Ask Smithsonian: Are Humans the Only Animals to Use the Stars to Navigate? http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/ask-smithsonian/ask-smithsonian-are-humans-the-only-animals/Yet another reason to fight light pollutionFri, 10 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Yearlong Migration of the Kirtland's Warblerhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/yearlong-migration-of-the-kirtlands-warbler/Credit: Nathan CooperMon, 06 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Incredible: A Cheetah Sprints to Catch a Springbokhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/incredible-a-cheetah-sprints-to-catch-a-spr/A cheetah mother caring for her cubs stumbles across an opportunity too good to pass up: a herd of springbok, grazing casually nearbyFri, 03 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Adorable Ground Squirrels Playing in Sweltering Heathttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/adorable-ground-squirrels-playing-in-swelter/Ground squirrels in the Kalahari have devised a remarkable method to guarantee portable shade: they use their tails as umbrellas.Fri, 03 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Installing Massive Machinery on the Seafloor Is Incredibly Diceyhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/innovation/installing-massive-machinery-on-the-seafloor/Lowering a massive compressor 984 feet down onto the seafloor isn't easy, even for a ship the size of North Sea Giant. For starters, each single yard of steel used to lower it weighs over 100 lbs.Fri, 03 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000A Pearl Harbor Veteran Tells His Harrowing Story of Survivalhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/a-pearl-harbor-veteran-tells-his-harrowing-s_1/Mickey Ganitch, a U.S. sailor stationed at Pearl Harbor, was gearing up for a football game on December 7, 1941, when hundreds of fighter pilots appeared in the sky. He recounts the rest of that horrific day and how he narrowly survived.Fri, 03 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000Allied Troops Used These Massive Pipe Bombs at Omaha Beachhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/allied-troops-used-these-massive-pipe-bombs/World War II veteran John Raaen Jr. was there the day Allied troops stormed Omaha Beach at Normandy. In retelling the experience to Weapon Hunter host Paul Shull, he singles out the Bangalore torpedo as a game-changer.Fri, 03 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000E.O. Wilson on Mapping Diversity of Life on Earthhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/eo-wilson-urges-tomorrows-scientists-to-m/Wed, 01 Mar 2017 00:00:00 -0000ODJB probably late 1936 - Livery Stable Blueshttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/arts-culture/odjb-probably-late-1936-livery-stable-blues/Rare production footage discovered by film archivists Mark Cantor and Bob DeFlores shows the entire performance of “Livery Stable Blues,” with breaks for the animal sounds at 1:12 and 1:26. Pianist Henry Ragas has been replaced by J. Russel Robinson.Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000ODJB makes a record - Livery Stable Blueshttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/arts-culture/odjb-makes-a-record-livery-stable-blues/For a newsreel, shot in late 1936 or early 1937, the band recreated their first recording session from February 26, 1917.Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000Watch a Male Seahorse Give Birth to Hundreds of Babieshttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/watch-a-male-seahorse-give-birth/Male seahorses are the ones who carry children and give birth. And when they do, they can produce up to 2,000 babies at one time.Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000How Obama's Historic 2008 DNC Speech Came Togetherhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/obamas-historic-2008-dnc-speech/In 2008, presidential candidate Barack Obama's scheduled speech to the Democratic National Convention fell on the anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s most iconic speech. While preparing, the usually composed Obama was overcome with emotion.Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000How a Chinese Empress Built the Largest Palace in the Worldhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/chinese-empress/Seeking to consolidate her grip on the Chinese throne, Empress Wu Zetian embarked on an audacious project: expanding the imperial palace on a scale never before seen in China, or the world.Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000Obama's Powerful Tribute to a Defining Civil Rights Momenthttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/obamas-powerful-tribute/In 2015, on the 50th anniversary of the march from Selma to Montgomery, the nation's first African American president paid tribute to a defining event in civil rights history.Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000A Plane Landing in Arctic Conditions Ends in Tragedyhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/a-plane-landing-in-arctic-conditions/It should have been a routine landing for First Air Flight 6560 at Canada's Resolute Bay Airport, despite the harsh Arctic conditions. It instead turned into a mysterious disaster.Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000Bee Training Session #1http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/bee-training-session-1/As part of a training session, a fake, plastic bee is used to demonstrate to a real bee how to move a ball to the center of a ring. Once the ball is in the center of the ring, the bees are rewarded with a sucrose solution. Credit: O.J. Loukola et al., Science (2017)Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000Bee Training Session #2http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/bee-training-session-2/Credit: O.J. Loukola et al., Science (2017)Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000Why Elk Calves Are Undetectable to Yellowstone's Wolveshttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/why-elk-calves-are-undetectable-to-yellowsto/In Yellowstone, elk calves are left unprotected by their herd and are the easiest prey for wolves to catch. Luckily, the newborns have no scent and, if hidden well, can fool a wolf into believing they're not there.Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000A Submarine Dangerously Tests How Deep It Can Gohttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/a-submarine-dangerously-tests-how-deep-it-ca/The USS Tang was a state-of-the-art Balao class submarine, certified by the Navy to dive up to 400 feet. But in order to test her for battle, commander Dick O'Kane decides to take her even deeper.Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000What Maximum Security Meant for Ancient Tomb Raidershttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/what-maximum-security-meant-for-ancient-tomb/The Han dynasty tombs were packed with some of the empire's most valuable relics. To guard against theft, colossal stones, each weighing six tons, were cut to block the passageways from relentless tomb raiders.Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000This Device Unearthed an Ancient Gladiator Schoolhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/this-device-unearthed-an-ancient-gladiator-s/With its abundant greenery, you'd have no idea there was once an ancient city located just outside of Rome. But by using an electronic scanner, scientists at Vienna's Ludwig Boltzmann Institute have found otherwise.Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000A Daring Rescue-by-Submarine, Deep in Enemy Watershttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/a-daring-rescue-by-submarine-deep-in-enemy/When a WWII Australian spy operation in occupied Borneo is uncovered, its operatives go into hiding. Rescuing them involves sneaking a sub into enemy waters and somehow getting to the men before the Japanese do.Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000This Wild Pig Has Fangs That Can Pierce Its Own Skullhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/this-wild-pig-has-fangs-that-can-pierce-its/A male babirusa's canines are an evolutionary mystery: They never stop growing, they're too fragile to hunt or forage with, and, given time, they end up twisting and penetrating the animal's own skull!Wed, 15 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000A Great White Can Go Through 20,000 Teeth in Its Lifetimehttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/a-great-white-can-go-through-20000-teeth-in/While a great white shark's 300 serrated teeth are an amazing hunting adaptation, what's even more amazing is their replaceability. In a lifetime, each shark can grow up to 20,000 of them.Mon, 13 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000Ask Smithsonian: Why Do We Kiss?http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/ask-smithsonian/ask-smithsonian-why-do-we-kiss/Is a kiss really just a kiss? In this one-minute video, our Ask Smithsonian Host, Eric Schulze, explains why we pucker up.Mon, 13 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000Why the Assassin Bug More Than Lives Up to Its Namehttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/why-the-assassin-bug-more-than-lives-up-to-i/The assassin bug's deadly proboscis is both sword and siphon. It uses its sharp nose to pierce and inject toxins into its victims, and then to suck out their liquified insides.Fri, 10 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000Here's How the Strongest Insect on the Planet Fightshttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/heres-how-the-strongest-insect-on-the-plane/Hercules beetles, as their name suggests, are immensely strong for their size. So when two males fight over feeding rights, you can be sure it's going to be a clash of the titans.Fri, 10 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000The Extraordinary Life Cycle of a Hornet Colonyhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/the-extraordinary-life-cycle-of-a-hornet-colony/After a hornet queen lays hundreds of eggs, her workers set about feeding the larvae chewed-up prey. With tiny waists, the workers can't digest solid food; they instead subsist on drops of amino acid from the larvae.Fri, 10 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000This Terrifying Worm Snatches Fish From the Ocean Floorhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/terrifying-worm-snatches-fish-from-ocean-floor/Sand strikers, also known as bobbit worms, are primitive-looking creatures that lack eyes, or even a brain. Despite this, they are savage predators who shoot out grapple-like hooks to reel in passing fish.Wed, 08 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000What a Broom Tied to a Periscope Means in the U.S. Navyhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/what-a-broom-tied-to-a-periscope-means-in-th/On February 7, 1943, the USS Wahoo sailed proudly into Pearl Harbor, a broom tied to her periscope. It was a wink to an old Naval tradition signifying a clean sweep of her enemies.Fri, 03 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000The Hagfish Is the Slimy Sea Creature of Your Nightmareshttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/the-hagfish-is-the-slimy-sea-creature-of-you/The hagfish is a slime-emitting ocean-dweller that's remained unchanged for 300 million years--and it shows. It has a skull (but no spine), velvet smooth skin, and a terrifying pit of a mouth that's lined with rows of razor-sharp teeth.Fri, 03 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000Why the USS Wahoo and Its Skipper Were a Perfect Matchhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/why-the-uss-wahoo-and-its-skipper-were-a-per/The new skipper of the Wahoo was the formidable Dudley Morton--a broad-shouldered Kentucky Baptist with an aggressive philosophy on how submarine warfare should be waged.Fri, 03 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000Does This Scenario Explain JFK Jr.'s Plane Crash?http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/does-this-scenario-explain-jfk-jrs-plane-c/A distracting radio issue, a hazy night, and a new pilot unsure of his instruments. According to investigators, these were some of the possible factors that led to John F. Kennedy Jr.'s tragic plane crash.Fri, 03 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000How the Crash of Flight 4590 Destroyed Concorde's Mystiquehttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/how-the-crash-of-flight-4590-destroyed-conco/The Concorde was once the peak of cutting-edge aircraft design and a status symbol for the world's elite travelers. But the horrific 2000 crash of flight 4590 marked a turning point for this iconic aviation brand.Fri, 03 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000Kīlauea Volcano | 29 January 2017http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/kilauea-volcano-29-january-2017/Credit: USGSThu, 02 Feb 2017 00:00:00 -0000The Carnivorous Plant That Feasts on Micehttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/the-carnivorous-plant-that-feasts-on-mice/While the carnivorous cravings of most flesh-eating plants are limited to small insects, one exception is the pitcher plant. It can consume anything that fits in its mouth—including a mouse!Mon, 30 Jan 2017 00:00:00 -0000New Hermit Crab Species Pylopaguropsis mollymulleraehttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/new-hermit-crab-species-pylopaguropsis-molly/This is video of the new hermit crab species Pylopaguropsis mollymullerae taken by Ellen Muller at dive site 'Something Special', southern Caribbean. Credit: Rafael Lemaitre and Ellen MullerMon, 30 Jan 2017 00:00:00 -0000How Vampire Bats Suck Blood for 30 Minutes Unnoticedhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/how-vampire-bats-suck-blood-30-minutes-unnoticed/Thanks to a local anesthetic in their spit, vampire bats are able to drink blood from their prey without being detected. That way, they can feed undisturbed for up to a half hour at a time.Fri, 27 Jan 2017 00:00:00 -0000Meet the Echidna, an Incredible, Fire-Proof Spiny Anteaterhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/meet-the-echidna-an-incredible-fire-proof-anteater/The echidna, or spiny anteater, is a marvel of defensive self-preservation, from its impenetrable spikes to its amazing ability to breathe through bushfires.Fri, 27 Jan 2017 00:00:00 -0000A Coconut Octopus Uses Tools to Snatch a Crabhttp://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/science/a-coconut-octopus-uses-tools-to-snatch-a-crab/Coconut octopuses are among the most intelligent invertebrates around: They use tools, carry their shelters around for when they need them, and, fittingly, adopt an underwater walking motion that's very similar to humans.Fri, 27 Jan 2017 00:00:00 -0000